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  • June 09, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    There's a lot of commentary going around interpreting yesterday's primaries as a sign that it's a banner year for women candidates -- especially Republican women. Hmmph.

    Yes, there were impressive wins yesterday in a few high-profile contests. (Plus Elizabeth Mitchell in Maine's Democratic primary, who nobody is mentioning.

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  • June 07, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Lots and lots of primaries tomorrow -- then things will slow down for a while, with just a few here and there until they start picking up again in late August.

    There's also some primary run-offs, most notably the one in Arkansas between Blanche Lincoln and Bill Halter. If Halter wins -- which I suspect he will, although polling shows it close -- Lincoln will be the third incumbent US Senator to be denied nomination this year, along with Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania and Bill Bennett of Utah.

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  • June 01, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    I frequently write about the decline of women Republicans in elected office, and with the certification of candidates for the 2010 ballot, it's time to turn that gaze to our own state of Massachusetts.

    The obvious news to note is that Karyn Polito and Mary Connaughton have legitimate chances to win statewide office, as treasurer and auditor respectively.

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  • June 01, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Alabama, Mississippi and New Mexico hold their primaries today. The big offices up for grabs are governor in Alabama and New Mexico. In Alabama, Artur Davis seems likely to become the first black Democratic nominee for governor of that state since reconstruction, while three conservatives -- including the notorious former judge Roy Moore -- battle on the Republican side.

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  • May 25, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    We do have a primary today, but it's just Idaho so nobody's paying much attention -- although there is a good GOP primary fight in a Dem-held district that's a must-win for Republicans if they hope to have their big wave victory in November. As far as Republican women on the ballot, there are two for Governor and one for the state's other Congressional district -- all running hopeless campaigns against Republican incumbents.

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  • May 19, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Well, we won't have Arlen Specter to kick around anymore. As you probably know, he was defeated in the Pennsylvania Democratic Senate primary; Joe Sestak will now face Republican Pat Toomey in November. In the other marquee races, Rand Paul pounded Trey Grayson in the Kentucky GOP Senate primary, while Jack Conway edged Dan Mongiardo for the Democrats (although it seems Mongiardo may be calling for a recount); Blanche Lincoln failed to reach 50%, and will have to face Bill Halter in a runoff election for the Arkansas Senate nod, with the winner probably going on to lose to Republican John Boozman; and Democrat Mark Critz won easily in the special election to replace Jack Murtha in Congress.

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  • May 14, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Thus far, seven states have held their 2010 congressional primaries (IL, IN, NE, NC, OH, TX, & WV), deciding nominees in 97 of the country's 435 districts.

    By my count, a total of 25 women ran as Republicans in 21 of those districts, including six incumbents. Those six incumbents, plus four other women, won their party nominations.

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  • May 11, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Richard Ross appears to have cleaned Peter Smulowitz's clock today, keeping Scott Brown's seat as GOP #5 in the state senate.Congrats to Ross, and a kudos to Smulowitz for his fine effort.

    Oh yeah, and Sal D. won the other special.

    Big result shaping up in WV, where that incumbent Dem Congressman I mentioned appears to have been knocked out in the primary.

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  • May 11, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Here in Massachusetts, we'll elect two new state senators today. One will be Sal DiDomenico, to replace Anthony Galluccio; the other will be either Republican Richard Ross or Democrat Peter Smulowitz, to replace Scott Brown. Both winners can expect serious challenges in November for a full term.

    On the national scene, Nebraska and West Virginia hold primaries today, and Georgia has a special-election primary to replace congressman Nathan Deal, who is running for governor.

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  • May 04, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    The Washington Post had a nice little article Friday about the record number of women running for Congress as Republicans -- which gives good play to the much-deserving Center for American Women and Poltics (CAWP) at Rutgers, and good spin from congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers of Washington. That would be enough of an excuse for me to delve further into my pet topic, the extinction of the elected Republican woman.

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  • April 29, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Here's an observation to provoke a little discussion, perhaps: Why are almost all the candidates who gain support from grassroots progressives male?

    I'm talking about candidates who run as Democrats, but against the party "establishment" -- the crash-the-gates types.

    The thought occured to me as I put together my latest article in the Phoenix, on the outsider progressives taking on establishment Democrats in Massachusetts.

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  • April 21, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    In my ongoing obsessive documentation of the vanishing elected Republican woman, there's been a little promising news, but also some setbacks for the ladies of the GOP.

    --The National Republican Congressional Committee has added 40 more candidates to its "Young Guns" program, now that 1st quarter 2010 fundraising numbers are in.

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  • March 11, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    There are only 6 women currently serving as state governors -- 3 Dems, 3 Repubs -- after Obama grabbed a couple for his cabinet and Sarah Palin resigned for... whatever the hell her reasons were. But there are lots and lots of opportunities this year: 37 states will hold gubernatorial elections, with the majority of those seats open due to term limits, retirements, or seeking other office.

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  • March 11, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Here's an interesting bit of trivia, culled from data kept by the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers: no woman has won a GOP primary for an open US Senate seat since 2002 (Elizabeth Dole).

    This streak will be tested this year, thanks to a whopping 11 open Senate seats -- five with departing Dems, six GOP.

    The hopes appear to rest on two women; the other 9 races have just a couple of completely non-viable female in them on the Republican side.

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  • March 11, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Shira Toeplitz of Roll Call has a good piece up about House Republicans' failure to recruit female candidates, which gives me the excuse I've been looking for to blog some more about one of my favorite pet topics, the extinction of the elected female Republican.

    As Toeplitz points out, there are quite a number of women running as Republicans, but mostly as also-rans or in hopeless races against safe incumbent Democrats.

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