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  • November 08, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    As I wrote last week, the election results appear to have left Republicans with the same miserably low representation by women in elected office as they had coming in. As I concluded: "The GOP's elected officials are and will be essentially 90% male for some years to come."

    Throughout this election cycle (and before) I've been trying to understand why the Republican Party has such a horrendous record of electing women.


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  • November 05, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    I'll be posting in the next couple of days about where I think things really stand in terms of women in Republican politics, now that we've seen this cycle play out. But for now, here are some estimates of how things went, by the numbers.

    These are my best figures, for now, of the number and percentage of women among Republican elected officials at various levels, going into Tuesday's elections, and resulting from those elections.

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  • November 01, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    The GOP needs to gain 39 net seats in the US House of Representatives to take majority control. That's in addition to the 20 open Republican seats that need to be filled; but Democrats are likely to win two of those, plus knock off two Republcan incumbents; and plus you have to factor in a GOP incumbent beaten in the primary...

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  • October 28, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    John Hawkins, who runs RightWingNews and has a column at Townhall.com, and is just a rung below RedState/CNN's Erick Erickson on the conservative blogosphere heirarchy of influence, wrote last week about the "Year of the Republican Woman." As my regular readers know, I am, let's say skeptical about that, but hey we'll know Tuesday night.

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  • October 05, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    USA Today wrote yesterday that in this supposed Year of the Republican Woman, the number of women in the US House of Representatives is likely to actually decline. You don't say?

    Fortunately, you were all aware of that likelihood, having carefully read all my blogging on the topic. But here's something that I haven't written (and that you wouldn't guess from that USA Today article): the percentage of women among the House Democrats will probably go up

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  • September 15, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Tuesday, Kelly Ayotte barely squeaked out a primary victory, keeping hope alive that Republicans will end up with at least as many female US Senators next year as they have now. With Lisa Murkowski out, and the rest of the women nominees iffy at best (Fiorina, Angle, McMahon, and now O'Donnell), an Ayotte loss would have been grim.

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  • August 30, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Reading the New York Times yesterday, I sadly accepted that, as a self-declared expert on Republican woman officeholders, I would have to write a blog post about this op-ed about how progressives somehow need to get themselves a Sarah Palin, rather than, oh, I don't know, the many many serious Democratic women who are major political players having a real impact on politics and policy in this country.

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  • August 25, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    For my obsessive interest in the ongoing extinction of elected Republican women, the big news from yesterday's primaries was the apparent defeat of incumbent US Senator Lisa Murkowski. Apparent, because it's close and Alaska is a wacky state where votes come in from the hinterlands by sled or something. But as of this moment it sounds like she's going to lose (and could not get her name on the ballot as an independent).

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  • August 16, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Just before I went on vacation, Diane Black narrowly won the GOP primary in the Tennessee 6th congressional district, making her the very likely successor to retiring Democrat Bart Gordon in that Republican-leaning district. Black thus becomes the first likely female member of the 2011 Republican freshman class. Not quite justifying the whole "Year of the Republican Woman" claims, but hey, it's a start.

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  • August 04, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Yesterday's three state primaries were not so good for the whole "Year of the Republican Woman" thing. As I noted in my preview, the few women running for the elite positions had no chance. And Jean Shudorf, who had a real chance to win the primary to succeed Tiahrt, lost.

    Yesterday produced two women GOP congressional nominees -- in addition to the three incumbents up for re-election.

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  • August 03, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Today we turn to the midwest, where Kansas, Michigan, and Missouri hold their primaries -- and I, naturally, indulge my obsession over women Republicans.

    We won't be seeing any women succeeding above the "glass floor" I've been writing about -- despite the opportunities presented by two open US Senate seats and two open governorships.

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  • July 27, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Today Oklahoma holds its primaries, so I thought I'd take a close look at how it stacks up for my big "GOP Glass Floor" theory.

    The theory -- and it's still just a theory -- is that the only women Republicans getting elected anymore are for the big, high-profile, state-wide offices of Governor and US Senator; and below that, they are growing extinct.

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  • July 09, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    We're in the midway summer doldrums of the 2010 primaries, so it's a good time to try to make premature analyses of the trends. This blog post is mine, and as my regular readers might have guessed, it will be on the topic of Republican women running for office.

    So here's my theory: I suggest that we may be seeing the development of a "glass floor" in the GOP, with women facing extinction at every level of elected office except the two big, high-profile, state-wide offices of US Senate and state Governor.

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  • June 12, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Just to follow up on my blog post from yesterday -- no, the special Republican caucus did not select Liz Brown today to replace Congressman Souder on the ballot, in the Indiana 3rd. They picked a guy.

  • June 11, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    I've been keeping you informed on Republican women running for office this year, so I want to make you aware of one whose fate will be decided in an unusual manner tomorrow, Saturday, in Indiana.

    This is the Indiana 3rd district, where the incumbent, Mark Souder, abruptly resigned (admitting infidelity) after winning his primary.

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