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  • June 07, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Lots and lots of primaries tomorrow -- then things will slow down for a while, with just a few here and there until they start picking up again in late August.

    There's also some primary run-offs, most notably the one in Arkansas between Blanche Lincoln and Bill Halter. If Halter wins -- which I suspect he will, although polling shows it close -- Lincoln will be the third incumbent US Senator to be denied nomination this year, along with Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania and Bill Bennett of Utah.

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  • May 19, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

    It had already been clear enough from reports coming out of Kentucky prior to Tuesday's primary, but any lingering questions were put to rest earlier tonight on the Rachel Maddow Show: Dr. Rand Paul, Republican nominee for US Senate in Kentucky, disapproves of the public accommodations provisions of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

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  • May 18, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Interesting couple of days on the political scene. Here in Massachusetts, we've got Democratic Governor Deval Patrick denouncing Charlie Baker for negative attack ads run by the Republican Governors Association -- mostly against independent candidate Tim Cahill. Patrick's critics naturally point out that he benefitted from third-party negative attack ads in 2006, which has forced him to parse the difference between the two -- or denounce both (he tried both approaches yesterday).

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  • March 30, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    I've had a theory for oh, maybe six months, that I've talked about with a number of people (including a few members of Congress and staffers) but have not publicly pontificated on. So, I'm now going to lay it out (a bit below), under the pretext of commenting on Kevin Drum, who in turn is commenting on Ezra Klein. Both smart folks, but both missing some of the lay of the land that I -- a self-anointed leading national expert on what I've dubbed the "movement conservative marketplace" -- know better than they.

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  • March 11, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Here's an interesting bit of trivia, culled from data kept by the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers: no woman has won a GOP primary for an open US Senate seat since 2002 (Elizabeth Dole).

    This streak will be tested this year, thanks to a whopping 11 open Senate seats -- five with departing Dems, six GOP.

    The hopes appear to rest on two women; the other 9 races have just a couple of completely non-viable female in them on the Republican side.

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  • March 02, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    'Tis the season for congressional vote ratings based on 2009. The latest is from the National Taxpayers Union, which as you might guess hates taxes.

    Every member of the Massachusetts delegation scored a solid 'F', which requires a score of 16% or lower; John Tierney came closest to passing with 5%.

    Turns out, the median score for Democrats was 4% in the House, and 6% in the Senate.

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  • February 26, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    ...most liberal, that is, according to the new National Journal vote ratings for 2009.

    The all-Democrat, 10-member Massachusetts delegation scored an 84.5 out of 100, putting us easily ahead of #2 Hawaii.

    As usual, New England was well-represented on the high side of the list: Vermont #3, Connecticut #4, Rhode Island #5, Maine #8, and New Hampshire a surprisingly moderate #11, at 61.

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  • February 25, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Odds are pretty good that today's health care summit will produce a Joe Wilson-esque "You Lie!" moment -- some crazy-ass comment or rude outburst that zooms around the blogosphere, leads off Olbermann, and raises a million dollars in 24 hours for the Republican who says it. But who will be the headline-grabber this time? I say Joe Barton; below I rank the GOP attendees in order of likelihood.

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  • February 23, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell announced today that eight GOP Senators, including himself, will attend Barack Obama's big "health care summit" on Thursday. They are: Mitch, Jon, Lamar, John, Chuck, Mike, Tom, and John.

    Back during the Sotomayor confirmation, I wrote that the GOP's glaring lack of elected female officeholders becomes especially glaring when the party is trying to oppose a woman or a women's issue.

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  • February 04, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Sometimes, the pathetic dysfunction of politics unfolds on such a masterful arc, it seems the work of a playwrite, or short-story author. I'm not sure whether this one is comedy or tragedy, but consider:

    --Organized labor in Massachusetts had a true-blue, loyal, lunch-bucket union guy ready to go in the special Senate election in congressman Stephen Lynch.

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  • January 22, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Lots of questions already piling up for Ask Me Anything Day! "DC Observer" asks:

    Who are the early Democratic frontrunners to challenge Brown in 2012? Do you see a member of the Cong. Delegation? A former member like Meehan? Someone from state politics? Private sector?

    I think that Meehan is very likely. A congressman would have to give up his seat to run, which seems unlikely unless the GOP really does take over the majority in the House (and looks likely to keep it after 2012), although a couple would be sorely tempted.

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  • January 20, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    In an online exclusive, I offer my analysis not of how Martha Coakley lost the election, but how Scott Brown (and his Romneyite campaign team) won it.

    My take? He copied the playbook used by Barack Obama in Iowa: expand the playing field.

    Also online: the Boston Phoenix editorial about the election -- which includes some choice words for Brown, Coakley, Obama, and others.

  • January 19, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    The Coakley campaign is taking time out of its busy day right now to hold a press conference complaining about pre-marked ballots -- I don't know what's going on there, and obviously anybody who commits voter fraud should be investigated, but it seems to me the campaign should be a little more concerned at the moment with trying not to get their butts whipped in this election.

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  • January 19, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein


    Dewey defeats Truman 2010?

    From Bob Powers at the Boston Globe, regarding the little oopsie I tweaked them for earlier:

    [Associated Press] was testing an election data feed to its Massachusetts clients. During corresponding tests at our end, the feed of AP's hypothetical test data was inadvertently posted for a few minutes on a single subsection page within our site. As soon as the error was discovered, it was removed. We regret the mishap.
  • January 19, 2010
    By Carly Carioli

    Boston.com briefly put up this map of the final results of today's election -- some 8 hours before polls closed!

    As you can see, over 2 million people voted, with Coakley eking out a 50-49 victory.

    The map was fully interactive, so you could roll over and get town-by-town results -- above we show Coakley taking Cohasset 56-43.

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