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  • July 01, 2011
    By David S. Bernstein

    Setti Warren will report raising $122,000 for the just-ended 2nd quarter, in just under two months since he launched his campaign. A spokesperson tells me they think that's a "strong start," while Warren's been focusing mainly on meeting and speaking with Democratic committees, and trying to raise his name recognition, and so on.

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  • July 01, 2011
    By David S. Bernstein

    "DeepThinker" asks:

    Should Elizabeth Warren run for U.S. Senate? The popularity of Bob Massie is greatly under-reported, Setti Warren is gaining ground, and Alan Khazei's past supporters are back. Scott Brown is proving to be very thin-skinned (where did those baseball cards go, anyway?) and unprepared for the heat he's about to get.

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  • June 01, 2011
    By David S. Bernstein

    "Boston Tom" asks:

    Have we heard the last of the announced Democrats to challenge Scott Brown? If not, who is either (a) strongly considering a run or (b) definitely in for a run against Brown.

    & "CMassPolitics" asks:

    When Patty Murray and the DSCC say that they will have a front-line Senate candidate in a few weeks, do they mean Elizabeth Warren, one of the congressmen, someone else? It seems to me that Frank, Neal, Olver and Menino all publicly talking down the current candidates is an effort to keep the decks clear until Capuano makes a decision.

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  • May 17, 2011
    By David S. Bernstein

    As my regular readers know, I believe that the 2010 "Year of the Republican Woman" was a bust, and a huge missed opportunity for the GOP. Others disagree with me. OK -- now what next?

    The 2012 Presidential race is not going to say much on the topic -- Michelle Bachmann will run, and we'll see how that goes. At the US House level it will be interesting to see whether the 2010 hoopla encourages more and better Republican women to run in 2012, but it's too early to tell.

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  • March 23, 2011
    By David S. Bernstein

    Salem immigration attorney Marisa DeFranco has filed to run for US Senator in 2012, seeking the Democratic nomination to challenge Scott Brown.

    "I am running -- not thinking about it, not exploring, I'm running," DeFranco says. "This has been in the works for months."

    Admittedly little-known, DeFranco intends to build a grassroots campaign, raising money in small-dollar contributions through her networks of attorneys and Democratic activists.

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  • March 23, 2011
    By David S. Bernstein

    Senator Scott Brown has just opened a federal political action committee (PAC), called the Brown Victory Committee, to collect large-dollar contributions -- using the exact same approach that Massachusetts Republicans derided Deval Patrick for, and which was barred by state law in 2009.

    The Brown Victory Committee, which operates under federal campaign laws, is not subject to the state ban.

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  • March 18, 2011
    By David S. Bernstein

    Ask Me Anything Day rolls on! "RMC Strategies" asks:

    Could you handicap the top 4 folks in the US Senate dem primary (based on assumptions of who may be in) and the top 4 folks who would be NEXT mayor of Boston (outside of Menino)?

    Well, the four who are making noise about running I would put in the following order of likelihood to win the nomination: Setti Warren, Kim Driscoll, Alan Khazei, Bob Massie -- with the caveat that I don't think there's a huge difference in the odds among all four.

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  • March 16, 2011
    By David S. Bernstein

    Hillary Clinton tells CNN's Wolf Blitzer that she is not interested in continuing to serve as Secretary of State in a 2nd Obama term, should he win re-election.

    That will undoubtedly stoke the already rampant rumors that John Kerry will become Secretary of State after the re-elect.

    Already, some political insiders in Massachusetts tell me that this rumor is helping persuade some of the state's Democratic heavyweights -- the Congressional delegation, for instance -- to pass on the 2012 cycle.

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  • February 28, 2011
    By David S. Bernstein

    Kim Driscoll, Mayor of Salem, is using a convenient excuse -- a reception in Easthampton for the women-in-politics organization Emerge Massachusetts -- to do a little statewide meeting-and-greeting today as she continues to lay the groundwork for a possible US Senate campaign.

    "The Emerge event is a natural thing I'd be doing," Driscoll said.

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  • November 16, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    It's long been my contention that, as in all matters, Baby Boomers will hold onto political offices until Millennials are ready to take them over, completely skipping my lazy-ass slacker Gen-X brethren.

    It turns out some of us are getting elected -- especially as Republicans.

    We're getting into the years when, by all rights, we slackers should be getting elected -- certainly to Congress, and even Senate.

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  • August 16, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Just before I went on vacation, Diane Black narrowly won the GOP primary in the Tennessee 6th congressional district, making her the very likely successor to retiring Democrat Bart Gordon in that Republican-leaning district. Black thus becomes the first likely female member of the 2011 Republican freshman class. Not quite justifying the whole "Year of the Republican Woman" claims, but hey, it's a start.

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  • July 28, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    In this week's issue of the Boston Phoenix -- in print tomorrow, online now -- I have a notebook-style column about the collapse of hopes for carbon-capping legislation to combat global warming. The article makes several different points and observations -- most of which involve the two US Senators from Massachusetts, John Kerry and Scott Brown.

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  • July 22, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Watching some US Senate floor debate yesterday, I was reminded of one of my favorite things about it -- something I have had fun with in the past, but not nearly often enough: yielding for a rhetorical question.

    When a Senator is speaking, another Senator may ask the speaker to yield for a question. What often happens is that a Senator on the same side in the debate -- typically the leadership representative, committee chair, or bill sponsor assigned to control debate for his or her party -- will use this parliamentary procedure to chime in with additional commentary or attack on the opposition.

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  • July 21, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Bear with me, and I'll show you how something good is about to happen for the economy, which can be traced directly back to the rabid conservative movement -- the GOP Village of the Damned, as I called it two years ago.

    It turns out that, barring further developments, the US Senate will successfully vote tomorrow to pass an amendment to a small business bill, that will in turn be passed later this week.

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  • June 22, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    White men are up against it today in the handful of primaries and runoffs around the country. Let's take a quick tour:

    --Mississippi. One Republican runoff here, between white guy Richard Cook and black guy Bill Marcy for the opportunity to get whupped by black Democrat Bennie Thompson.

    --North Carolina. The headliner here is the Democratic Senate primary runoff between "Cal" Cunningham and Elaine Marshall, with the winner to challenge Richard Burr, one of the few potentially vulnerable Republican incumbents.

    Read More

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