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  • July 18, 2012
    By David S. Bernstein

    Congressional candidate Sean Bielat, CEO of CongressionalLoveMatch.com* (NOTE: * = possibly not true; see below) has run into some criticism in his quest to become a future trivia answer (ie, What Republican did President Joe Kennedy III defeat in his very first election?).

    Bielat, who runs AstrologicalVotersGuide.

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  • June 29, 2012
    By David S. Bernstein

    Happy Ask Me Anything Day! "Fall River Conservative" asks:

    In the MA-04 GOP primary... will Steinhof win due to constant back and forth sniping of Bielat and Childs? I sure hope so, because he seems like the True Conservative out of the three candidates!

    Hmmm....congressional candidate David Steinhof is a "Fall River Conservative" - are you related?

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  • April 27, 2012
    By David S. Bernstein

    Earlier this week (while I was off on vacation) there were some Presidential primaries, which you probably heard about. There were also some primaries for congressional races, which leads me to update the status of women Republicans running for seats in the US House of Representatives -- which I suggested a month ago is not looking very promising for those hoping to see some improvement on the current rate of just 10% of House Republicans.

    Read More

  • March 23, 2012
    By David S. Bernstein

    Taking two together; "BStarr" asks:

    Is Stephen Lynch a lock in the new 8th?

    ...and "Ryan H." asks:

    Does [Sam] Sutter have a chance against [incumbent Bill] Keating?

    Yes, Lynch looks like he'll cruise to re-election without working up much of a sweat. And while I think Sutter is a strong candidate worth watching, I think he really needed a Cape candidate in the primary, whether state rep O'Leary or someone else, to take votes away from Keating in the new 9th. Tough to see how Sutter wins.

  • March 08, 2012
    By David S. Bernstein

    With Richard Tisei, the Republicans have a good candidate to take on potentially vulnerable Democratic incumbent Congressman John Tierney in the North Shore district. I think Tierney will win, but it's a race worth watching for sure.

    One of Tisei's strengths is that he's not a mean-spirited, carpet-bombing asshole type of Republican.

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  • March 07, 2012
    By David S. Bernstein

    Ohio Republican Congresswoman Jean Schmidt lost her primary yesterday, which seems like a good excuse for me to take a first look at how this election cycle is shaping up for women Republicans in the US House of Representatives -- following up on my Senate overview last week.

    As my regular readers know, I was quite adamant that the much-touted "Year of the GOP Woman" in 2010 was a failure.

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  • August 26, 2011
    By David S. Bernstein

    Boston may be the epicenter of Massachusetts politics, but the effects of suburbanization are undeniable. At the moment, neither the senate president nor the speaker of the house lives in the city. And in two years, the unthinkable could become reality: Boston might not have a single congressman resident in its borders.

    Read More

  • August 02, 2011
    By David S. Bernstein

    You probably know that freshman Congressman Bill Keating voted yes on the debt-ceiling bill yesterday -- joining Steve Lynch and Niki Tsongas from the Massachusetts delegation, in a disappointment to Bay State liberals.

    But here's an even more surprising vote: Keating voted yes on an amendment to restore Bush-era restrictions on travel to Cuba.

    Read More

  • March 18, 2011
    By David S. Bernstein

    I briefly interrupt Ask Me Anything Day to point you to a nice feature about the new "Gen-X" Republicans in Congress, written by Kathleen Hennessey of the LA Times, which quotes New Hampshire freshman Frank Guinta claiming "I was an Alex P. Keaton when I was a kid."

    Hah! Four months ago I wrote a nice feature about the new "Gen-X" Republicans heading to Congress, in which I called Guinta an "Alex P.

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  • January 21, 2011
    By David S. Bernstein

    "ChrisMath" asks:

    Do you see Richard Tisei challenging Rep. John Tierney in the 6th District in 2012? If so, do you think he has a chance at a win? He's well liked and certainly less controversial than Hudak was.

    Tisei v. Tierney would be awfully confusing to write about - I'd prefer candidates with fewer similar letters in their names.

    Read More

  • January 21, 2011
    By David S. Bernstein

    "Certifiable Political Junkie" asks:

    One, thinking ahead to 2014, does anyone come to mind as a plausible GOP candidate for Governor? Second, do you foresee any of the congressional incumbents retiring in order to avoid the redistricting bloodbath and a potential primary?

    On the first question: Sure -- Charlie Baker, for one.

    Read More

  • November 16, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    It's long been my contention that, as in all matters, Baby Boomers will hold onto political offices until Millennials are ready to take them over, completely skipping my lazy-ass slacker Gen-X brethren.

    It turns out some of us are getting elected -- especially as Republicans.

    We're getting into the years when, by all rights, we slackers should be getting elected -- certainly to Congress, and even Senate.

    Read More

  • November 03, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    The large shifting of seats in the US House of Representatives from red to blue may need little more explanation than this: in arguably the worst economic conditions since the Great Depression, the country voted arguably the largest backlash against the party in power since the Great Depression.

    I suspect that, once you get beyond the partisans and ideologues, the folks we call "swing voters" took a pretty intuitive and reasonable view of things: they don't blame Obama and the Democrats for causing the recession, and they suspect that actions taken by Obama and the Democrats have kept things from being much worse, but things aren't good, which probably means that Obama and the Democrats don't have the answers to make things good.

    Read More

  • November 02, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    Just a little something to keep in mind as you watch returns tonight. There's a reason that Massachusetts's congressional seats are going to remain all, or mostly, in Democratic hands despite whatever number of seats flip from blue to red across the country.

    The seats that are likely to flip are not random. They are almost all, in order of vulnerability: 1) open seats; 2) first-term incumbents; 3) districts where McCain beat Obama (many of which have grown increasingly conservative over the incumbent's tenure); or 4) two-term incumbents, who have only won in the '06 and '08 Democratic wave elections.

    Read More

  • November 01, 2010
    By David S. Bernstein

    The GOP needs to gain 39 net seats in the US House of Representatives to take majority control. That's in addition to the 20 open Republican seats that need to be filled; but Democrats are likely to win two of those, plus knock off two Republcan incumbents; and plus you have to factor in a GOP incumbent beaten in the primary...

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Boston's Last Congressman?
Published 8/26/2011 by David S. Bernstein
Boston may be the epicenter of Massachusetts politics, but the effects of suburbanization are undeniable. At the moment, neither the senate president nor the speaker...

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Keating Veers Right On Cuba
Published 8/2/2011 by David S. Bernstein
You probably know that freshman Congressman Bill Keating voted yes on the debt-ceiling bill yesterday -- joining Steve Lynch and Niki Tsongas from the Massachusetts...

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