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  • September 22, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Stained

    Traditionally considered the purview of male directors, the horror genre has increasingly been embraced by women. Taking note of this, the All Things Horror people present a program of shorts and features by female filmmakers from the Viscera Film Festival, "a nonprofit organization committed to expanding opportunities for contemporary female horror filmmakers."

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  • July 30, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Some may have been more beautiful, but no other actress has been as ethereal, otherworldly, and unattainable. So when Greta Garbo spoke on screen in her first sound film, it was a big deal. And when she first laughed? She did so as the hardnosed Soviet commissar who ends up seduced by Paris and Melvyn Douglas's aristocratic enemy of the people in Ernst Lubitsch's Ninotchka (1939), and it might be her best role of all.

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  • July 23, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Less graphic but perhaps more disturbing than Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange is his Doctor Strangelove Or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Bomb (1964). It might be the funniest doomsday movie ever made, and certainly has the funniest character names, like Merkin Muffley and the Kissinger-esque nuclear scientist of the title, two of the three roles played by the great Peter Sellers.

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  • July 21, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Nobody had as much fun with human folly as Stanley Kubrick, and two of his satiric masterpieces screen this week at the Somerville Theatre. His X-rated adaptation of Anthony Burgess's A Clockwork Orange (1971) still shocks today. In a hilariously awful dystopia the only sympathetic character is Malcolm McDowell's sociopathic delinquent, perhaps because he croons "Singin' in the Rain" and listens to Beethoven's Ninth Symphony while engaging in his ultra-violence.

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  • July 09, 2011
    By Peter Keough


    Let's push the cinema clock back a bit, not just before 3D, but before color and even sound. After seeing Buster Keaton's silent comic masterpiece Seven Chances (1925) with a live score provided by Jeff Rapsis on a digital synthesizer, you might agree with those who think all these "advancements" have detracted from the essence of cinema.

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  • June 23, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    The puns about this film may be getting tiresome, but if you can spare a couple of hours you might find that Quentin Dupieux's Rubber (2010) will jack up some excitement. You might say its tale of a mute, telepathic, murderous automobile tire treads familiar ground, recalling John Carpenter's Christine and Steven Spielberg's Duel

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  • March 23, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Now that all the St. Patrick's Day hoopla is over, we can take a look at what's really up in the Ould Sod. Films featured in the 12th Annual Irish Film Festival include Darragh Byrne's Parked, in which an Irish guy (Colm Meaney) returns home to find that he has nowhere to live but his car. Also timely is Risteard Ó Domhnaill's The Pipe, a documentary about a village's quixotic battle against Big Oil.

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  • February 19, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    For some fans, the 1954 film adaptation of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea is a classic. But those attending SF36, the 36th annual Boston science-fiction marathon, will be treated to the really classic version of the fantastic Jules Verne tale - the silent 1916 adaptation by Stuart Paton. At the very least, it will be fun to compare squids.

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