bestnom1000x50
  • June 14, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Room at the Top (1959)

    You probably know the movies, made in Britain and Hollywood over the course of three decades, but you might not recognize the director's name. The Harvard Film Archive rectifies that with their retrospective series Jack Clayton: Between Innocence and Experience. It starts tonight with two of his masterpieces from the British New Wave.

    Read More

  • May 31, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    After the oneiric convolutions of Guy Maddin, "The Anarchic Imagination of Alex Cox," a retrospective series playing at the Harvard Film Archive through June 11, should be a piece of cake. Today they'll be screening Repo Man (1984; 7 pm), Cox's first and perhaps best film. In it Emilio Estevez plays the title debt collector whose life goes off the tracks when he repos a car with a surprise in the trunk.

    Read More

  • April 19, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Barren Lives (Vidas Secas)

    Brazilian cinema owes much of its vitality, relevance, and international stature to the director celebrated in the Harvard Film Archive retrospective, "Nelson Pereira dos Santos, Cinema Novo and Beyond," which runs through May 7. For over half a century dos Santos has made vivid neorealistic films that are politically committed and quintessentially Brazilian.

    Read More

  • April 04, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Black Natchez (1967)

    Shooting documentaries can be risky, as Ed Pincus, one of the leading local pioneers in the field, learned in the 1970s when a contact helping him with his 1967 documentary Black Natchez threatened his life, forcing him and his family into seclusion. That ill-fated film will open the Harvard Film Archive retrospective of his work, "Ed Pincus, Lost and Found," which will run through April 9.

    Read More

  • March 22, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Although Shoah (1985), Claude Lanzmann's monumental account of the Holocaust, was over nine hours long, a lot was left out. For example, the full interview with Jan Karski, the Polish Resistance leader who travelled to Washington to inform President Roosevelt of the ongoing genocide that he had witnessed.

    Read More

  • March 15, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    The Harvard Film Archive series Sing, Memory: The Post-War England of Terence Davies celebrates one of the greatest living British filmmakers. Davies's work includes period-rich, semi-autobiographical films such as Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988) - which engage in a kind of working-class Proustian remembrance of things past- and meticulously detailed, compelling adaptations, such as his newest film, The Deep Blue Sea

    Read More

  • February 23, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Had F. Scott Fitzgerald been more adept at the art of cinema, he might have had a career like that of the urbane auteur celebrated in the Harvard Film Archive retrospective The Discreet Charm of Whit Stillman. It runs through Sunday, opening today with his exquisite debut feature Metropolitan (1990), a Renoir-esque exploration of the Manhattan debutante scene where socialites can be socialists and everyone has something elegant, witty, and urbane to say.

    Read More

  • February 16, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Korean cinema has always possessed kinetic pizzazz, but Park Kwang-su, little known in the West, helped it develop its poetry, profundity, and political impact. The Harvard Film Archive series Park Kwang-su and the Origins of the Korean New Wave, which runs through February 27, will present a retrospective of the director's films, beginning with A Single Spark (1995), an adaptation of the true story of a factory worker who immolated himself in 1971 protesting unconscionable working conditions.

    Read More

  • February 12, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Paradise (2009)

    Michael Almereyda made a big indie stir with his 1994 vampire movie Nadja followed up in 2000 with his post-modern version of Hamlet starring Ethan Hawke. Since then he has kept a low profile making non-fiction films, including Paradise (2009), which is essentially a visual diary recording everyday epiphanies.

    Read More

  • February 05, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    The Robert Bresson retrospective at the Harvard Film Archive continues with Une Femme Douce (1969), a film which, along with Bresson's Mouchette, Au hasard Balthazar, The Trial of Joan of Arc, and others, demonstrates the great auteur's empathy with the suffering of women and his austere acknowledgment of their dignity and strength.

    Read More

  • February 04, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Many were appalled that Tilda Swinton was snubbed for a Best Actress Oscar nomination for her role as the beleaguered mother of a sociopath in Lynne Ramsay's We Need To Talk About Kevin. See what they're talking about at this preview screening of the harrowing, and sometimes hilarious, film at the Harvard Film Archive.

    Read More

  • January 27, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Every new film by Claire Denis is a cinematic event, even more so when the great French director is on hand to discuss it afterwards. She'll be doing so at tonight's screening of her most recent film, White Material (2009), which stars the inimitable Isabelle Huppert as the determined French matriarch of a family-run coffee plantation in an African country convulsed by civil war.

    Read More

  • January 19, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Pickpocket (1959)

    His films blow through the over-produced pabulum of most current cinema like a brisk, purifying breeze. The Harvard Film Archive opens its massive month-long retrospective The Complete Robert Bresson with Pickpocket ( 1959; 7 pm + January 22 at 5 pm), a meticulously detailed portrait of a young man learning the title trade that is both a how-to masterpiece and an existential enigma.

    Read More

  • December 16, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Henri-Georges Clouzot has often been compared to Hitchcock, but even the master of suspense couldn't come up with some of the excruciating twists that are in the French director's masterpiece Diabolique (1955). The mistress (Simone Signoret) and the wife (Vera Clouzot, the director's spouse) of the headmaster of a miserable boarding school agree that the guy is a pig and plot to do him in.

    Read More

  • November 25, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    He took his inspiration from Alfred Hitchcock by way of Jean-Paul Sartre and made ingeniously suspenseful movies that were all the more powerful because of their existential implications. That is especially true of The Wages of Fear (1953), the opening film for the Harvard Film Archive retrospective The Complete Henri-Georges Clouzot, which runs through December 18.

    Read More

< Previous | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next >
ADVERTISEMENT
Related Articles

king_hu_retrospective
Boston Phoenix
Women with swords: King Hu and the Art of Wuxia
Published 3/15/2013 by BRETT MICHEL

farfromafghanistan_film
Boston Phoenix
Review: Far From Afghanistan
Published 3/8/2013 by MICHAEL ATKINSON

 Friends' Activity   Popular 
All Blogs
Follow the Phoenix
  • newsletter
  • twitter
  • facebook
  • youtube
  • rss
ADVERTISEMENT
Latest Comments
ADVERTISEMENT
Search Blogs
 
Outside The Frame Archives