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  • October 28, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Here's a chance to get your horror quota filled before the big Halloween rush on Monday, as the Coolidge Corner Theatre presents its 11th Annual Halloween Horror Movie Marathon. They begin the 12 hour endurance test with two of the best. Suspiria (1977) by Dario Argento might be the maestro's scariest; it's the tale of a coven of witches in a ballet school and it is visually glorious and utterly disgusting.

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  • October 20, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    It's a safe bet that the walking dead in Lucio Fulci's cult classic Zombie (1979) could kick, and perhaps eat, the asses of the zombies in any other film you could name. These guys can turn great white sharks into sushi. One of the favorite films of Guillermo del Toro, it may or may not be screened with the complimentary barf bag that was offered to audiences when it was first released.

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  • October 16, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    For a long time Hollywood shied away from confronting the Holocaust. Stanley Kramer was one of the first directors to broach the subject in his Judgment At Nuremberg (1961), an epic rendition of the postwar trial of Nazi war criminals. Its three-plus hours features harrowing testimony, intense courtroom drama, the Oscar-nominated black-and-white cinematography of Ernest Laszlo, and a stellar, if sometimes unlikely cast, including the reassuring Spencer Tracy as a judge, Marlene Dietrich, Judy Garland, and Montgomery Clift as victims, a perky William Shatner as a US army adjutant, and Burt Lancaster and the Oscar-winning Maximilian Schell as defendants.

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  • October 02, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    After seeing, and smelling, the blossoming corpse plant at a Seattle conservatory a few months back, the first thing I (and just about everyone else) thought was, "That looks just like Audrey Junior in Little Shop Of Horrors (1960)!" Maybe Ecologist Aaron Ellison can explain if there is any connection between the two intimidating tubers when he discusses carnivorous plants after this Science on Screen screening of the film.

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  • September 30, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    No one puts on a showcase of the macabre like J. Cannibal, the cult impresario, who works as an undertaker when he isn't busy being a zombie connoisseur. In tonight's FEAST OF FLESH XI he outdoes himself, with music from local metalcore band Acaro, bumps and grinds from horror/stripper ensemble Black Cat Burlesque, and a screening of Demons (1985).

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  • September 10, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Back in 1922, with WWI fresh in everyone's minds, the young film director Manfred Noa made the silent film Nathan The Wise, an adaptation of an 18th century Gotthold Ephraim Lessing play about the title Jewish merchant who brokered a treaty between belligerents during the Crusades. To acknowledge the 10th anniversary of 9/11, the Goethe-Institut and the Coolidge Corner Theatre will screen this prescient and passionate plea for tolerance and peace.

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  • September 04, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    The soul-destroying grind of clerical drudgery has been part of the American experience at least since "Bartleby the Scrivener." No offense to Herman Melville, but the version of that theme depicted in Mike Judge's first film, Office Space (1999), is a lot funnier. Also, the vengeance that its disaffected and downsized drones take on their ruthless masters is a lot more effective.

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  • August 27, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    When it comes to Italian neorealist movies, the only movie that rivals De Sica's Umberto D. in the tear-jerk department is Federico Fellini's heartbreaking La Strada (1954). Fellini's wife Giulietta Masina plays Gelsomina, a simple, pure-hearted girl devoted to the brutish circus strong man Zampano (Anthony Quinn), who bought her from her impoverished family to assist in his act.

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  • August 25, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    No matter how many times you watch it, Zoolander, (2001) never lets you down. There will always be something that renews your appreciation of the film's hilarity. Like the hallucinogenic orgy with the Maori tribesman and Finnish dwarfs. Or the lines "You can read minds?" and "I feel like I'm taking crazy pills!" Ben Stiller directed this classic dumb comedy and stars as the titular supermodel, challenged for the top spot by archrival Hansel, played by Owen Wilson.

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  • August 21, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    There are many shocking moments in Stanley Kubrick's adaptation of Stephen King's novel The Shining (1980), but the real terror is subtle, insidious, and will linger in your nightmares. Some images will never leave you: the elevator full of blood, for example, or the Diane Arbus twins, or the woman in the tub, or the eerie sound that Danny - the little boy with the title gift of ESP - makes when his Big Wheel rolls from bare floors to carpeting in the endless, empty corridors of the Overlook Hotel.

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  • August 11, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    In addition to being the big shot director of blockbusters like Spider-Man, Sam Raimi is a master of splatter, as evidenced by Army Of Darkness (1992), the concluding chapter of his Evil Dead trilogy. In it the legendary Bruce Campbell returns as Ash, the wisecracking hero of the earlier films, who gets transported back to a grisly 14th century where he must fight the power of black magic and visceral special effects to retrieve the Necronomicon, his ticket back home.

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  • July 28, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Kind of like Toxic Avenger by way of Trash Humpers, Jim Muro's Street Trash (1987) lives up to its title. Stinky derelicts start buying booze called Tenafly Viper at Ed's liquor store for a buck a bottle and unleash the cheapo, gross-out special effects. Not only a revoltingly hilarious indulgence in politically incorrect bad taste, the movie also reflects, not unlike Bret Easton Ellis's American Psycho, the contempt for poverty so popular during the Greed is Good era.

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  • June 24, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Far from being a source of escapism, the best science fiction instead offers a perspective on the problems of our times. Such is the case with Joss Whedon's Serenity (2005), the feature film based on the cult-favorite TV show set on an outlaw cargo ship in a 26th century that has at least as much bad shit going on as the present.

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  • June 23, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    What to watch on a weekend that offers midnight showings of Rubber, Serenity, and Jason Weiner's Hobo With A Shotgun? No beating around the bush with the latter; the title tells it exactly the way it is, with Rutger Hauer unforgettable and unwashed as the lethal bum. Sometimes hilarious, other times weirdly touching, always violent as hell - of the three midnight options, this one just might be the best.

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  • June 16, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    If 3D was meant for anything, it was for photographing a blood-dripping machete wielded by a maniac wearing a hockey mask. Long before there was Avatar, schlockmeister Steve Miner added depth to bad boy Jason Voorhees in Friday the 13th Part III 3D (1982) the old fashioned way - with ugly cardboard glasses.

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