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  • March 08, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Perhaps the earliest of the found-footage horror movies, Ruggero Deodato's Cannibal Holocaust (1980) remains one of the most grotesque and frightening. It consists in part of footage supposedly shot by a film crew in South America who run afoul of indigenous people, and then some. The rest, equally disturbing, involves what happens to the film after it's brought back to civilization.

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  • March 04, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    A sex symbol, a role model, and one of the best and smartest actors of his generation, Viggo Mortensen joins a list that includes Meryl Streep, Jonathan Demme, and Robert Altman in receiving the esteemed Coolidge Award. The festivities start at noon with a screening of David Cronenberg's Eastern Promises (2007), for which Mortenson received a Best Actor Oscar nomination and which includes the unforgettable nude knife fight in a sauna.

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  • February 27, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Winner of this year's Coolidge Award, Viggo Mortensen has brought to life characters ranging from the regal Aragorn in Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings trilogy to the adulterous "blouse man" in Tony Goldwyn's A Walk on the Moon (1999). Perhaps he has done his best and edgiest work in collaboration with David Cronenberg, as is the case in A History of Violence (2005), about a mild-mannered small town family man who is in fact a ruthless assassin trying to escape his past.

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  • February 10, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Any film with Udo Kier in it is, de facto, a must-see. In the portmanteau horror film The Theater Bizarre (2011) he plays the creepy puppet man - is he a muppet or a man? - who introduces the six tales of terror presented at the title venue. Among the committee of directors is George Romero collaborator Tom Savini, whose episode " Wet Dreams" involves a wronged wife's oneiric revenge, and Canadian filmmaker Karim Hussain's "Vision Stains," which investigates the nature of memory by means of hypodermic needles and eyeballs.

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  • January 29, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    We've seen time travel so often in the movies you have to wonder why nobody's figured out how to do it in real life. Certainly if the amiable dunces (Keanu Reeves and Alex Winter) in Stephen Herek's Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure (1989) can visit past luminaries like Napoleon and "So-crates" via George Carlin and a phone booth, some actual scientist should have cracked the puzzle by now.

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  • January 25, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Andy Samberg and Rashida Jones star in Celeste and Jesse Forever

    Who needs to brave the thin air and mobbed screenings of Sundance when you can enjoy the very best the fest has to offer in the comfort and convenience of the Coolidge Corner Theatre? Fresh from its debut in Park City comes Lee Toland Krieger's indie rom-com Celeste and Jesse Forever, which stars Rashida Jones and Andy Samberg.

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  • January 20, 2012
    By Alexandra Cavallo

    Boston's now-defunct industrial/metal heavy-hitters Big Catholic Guilt played their last show as a regular working band at the (also defunct) Rathskellar back in '96 - reuniting for a blow-out, one-night-only show at the Middle East two years back - but their legacy of scene domination lives on. Today you can catch a screening of that reunion show Big Catholic Guilt-Resurrection - filmed in full and including the entire 22-song set-list - when it opens for public viewing at the Coolidge.

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  • January 14, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Every year, it's the same: they announce the five "Best Foreign Language Film" Academy Award nominees and you haven't heard of any of them, let alone seen them. But here's a chance to get an early look at a strong contender, the official French Oscar entry, Declaration Of War. Directed by and starring Valérie Donzelli, it's about a young couple who discover that their infant son has a potentially terminal brain tumor.

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  • January 05, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    As technology now invades every aspect of our lives, the paranoid, dystopic scenario posed by James Cameron in The Terminator (1984), arguably the director's best film, appears creepily prescient. In his signature role, Arnold Schwarzenegger plays an unstoppable cyborg from a future dominated by machines sent to the present day to bump off the woman who would one day be the mother of the man who might save the human race.

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  • December 18, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    If you were wondering where the basic concepts behind Coke commercials, Mitt Romney ads, and advertising and propaganda in general come from, you should take a look at Sergei Eisenstein's Battleship Potemkin (1925). His silent version of the 1905 mutiny on the title Russian warship marks a high point in montage, the technique by which he edits disparate images into a dynamic fusion that compels audiences to buy something they might otherwise not be interested in - in this case the Bolshevik Revolution.

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  • December 11, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    If you've seen Rise of the Planet of the Apes and Project Nim this year, you owe it to yourself to see what might be Terry Gilliam's best movie, Twelve Monkeys (1995). A phantasmagorical riff on Chris Marker's short La Jetée (1962), it stars Bruce Willis as a poor schmuck from a future dystopia enlisted to travel through time to undo the plague begun by a well-intended but delusional animal rights activist played by Brad Pitt.

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  • December 01, 2011
    By Alexandra Cavallo

    Let's face it, some movies should never have been made in 3D. For instance, Jonas Brothers: The 3D Concert Experience. Scratch that - it probably shouldn't have been made, period. But then there are movies that seem perfect for in-your-face, three-dimensional media blitzes. Such is the case with the classic fright flick Creature From The Black Lagoon (1954), which was made in 3D long before it became the Tyler Perry of film techniques.

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  • November 20, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Called "the bad boy of Buddhism," Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche left a monastery in India in the '60s for the West where he smoked, drank, and caroused with women. He also helped transform the counterculture with his teachings and meditation techniques, inspiring such acolytes as Thomas Merton, Allen Ginsberg, Joni Mitchell, and David Bowie.

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  • November 03, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Tony Scott may have directed it, but True Romance (1993) might be Quentin Tarantino's best movie. He wrote the screenplay about a dorky guy, not unlike himself, who falls in love with a hip sex worker, grabs a suitcase full of cocaine, and takes on all comers. Sounds dumb, but it glints with brilliant, hilarious dialogue.

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  • November 01, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    A must-see event on the local film calendar, the Boston Jewish Film Festival opens tonight at the Coolidge with Leo Khasin's debut feature, Kaddish for a Friend. The festival's theme is "Neighbors Near and Far," a sentiment epitomized by this story of a Muslim teenager in Moscow forced to repair the apartment of a curmudgeonly Russian neighbor that he and his pals vandalized.

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