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  • November 11, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    An environmental warning before people even knew there was an environment, Robert Gordon's It Came From Beneath the Sea (1955) features a giant octopus provoked by H-bomb testing into destroying San Francisco. It makes sense when you see it, especially when University of Chicago professor Michael LaBarbera explains the monster's biology when he hosts this session of Science on Screen series at the Coolidge.

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  • October 21, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    It's hard to believe that nearly 30 years have passed since we first saw the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man and watched Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, and the rest of the goofy crew get slimed with ectoplasm in Ivan Reitman's Ghostbusters (1984). It's still a hoot, though.

    Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard St, Brookline :: Monday, October 22 @ 7 pm :: $9; $6 seniors :: 617.

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  • October 19, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Here are two approaches to the art of terror screening at the Coolidge's @fter Midnight program: Michael Paul Stephenson's doc The American Scream (2012) examines the phenomenon of folks in Fairhaven, MA, turning their homes into haunted houses for the kids on Halloween, and Tobe Hooper's Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986), starring Dennis Hopper, just scares the shit out of you.

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  • October 09, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    In the series Stage & Screen, people putting on a play at the Huntington Theatre discuss a film version of a play screened at the Coolidge. Tonight Michael Wilson, director of the Huntington's upcoming production of Christopher Shinn's Now or Later, discusses that play's similarities to Franklin J. Schaffner's adaptation of Gore Vidal's The Best Man (1964).

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  • October 05, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    After The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974), Tobe Hooper tried to lighten up a bit with the carnival hijinks of The Funhouse (1981). In it, a bunch of teens sneak into the title ride and undergo what usually happens to teens in this kind of movie.

    Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard Ave, Brookline | Friday, October 5 @ midnight | $9 | 617.

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  • September 29, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    A little-known milestone in the history of movies took place 50 years ago at a film festival in Oberhausen, Germany, when 26 German filmmakers signed a statement demanding an independent cinema. In his lecture "Provoking Reality: the Oberhausen Manifesto," film historian Ralph Eue explains the movement and its influence and presents select films from the project Provoking Reality.

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  • September 28, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Phoenix film critic Brett Michel talks the talk at Talk Cinema, hosting a screening of Julian Farino's upcoming romantic comedy, The Oranges, a comedy about the fallout from a May/December romance. Watch the movie and air your opinions.

    Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard Ave, Brookline | Sunday, September 30 @ 10 am | $20; $10 students | 617.

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  • September 27, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    True, there's a presidential election coming up, but here's a chance to vote for something really important. From September 28 to October 4 the 15th annual Manhattan Film Festival will be screening its 10 finalists in 300 theaters in cities worldwide, our own Coolidge Corner Theatre included, inviting viewers to cast ballots for their favorite.

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  • September 16, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    In Alfred Hitchcock's early silent movies, nobody can hear them scream. In Blackmail (1929) , the last of these, a working girl murders a rakish painter in self defense. Panicking, she tries to cover it up, and a sympathetic detective helps her out. But there was a witness, which is where the blackmail comes in, and it climaxes with a chase in the British Museum, a warm-up for Mount Rushmore in North by Northwest

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  • September 15, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    The kids are skateboarding and acting cool, all right, but as the title of Martin Perseil's offbeat documentary makes clear, This Ain't California (2012). It is, in fact, '70s East Berlin, where three boys rebel against the stringent Marxist regime by imitating Western punks. The years pass and it is suddenly 1989 - the Wall has fallen, the kids have grown up, and now they must redefine their identities.

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  • September 09, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    FedEx boxes of a certain size have never been the same after an infamous scene in David Fincher's Se7en (1998), a film that has its share of outrageously brutal moments. A serial killer has taken the seven deadly sins to heart, choosing victims who are flagrantly guilty of each vice and murdering them with hideous, Dantesque appropriateness.

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  • September 06, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    [Rec] (2007), the splashy Spanish zombie film remade by Hollywood into the more tepid Quarantine (2008), has itself generated sequels. The third in the series, Pablo Plaza's [Rec]3 Genesis (2012), resumes the premise of a zombie plague as seen in the now obligatory found footage. This time around the source is a wedding video, which records a reception that goes beyond Bridesmaids wrong when a guest starts eating human flesh.

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  • August 30, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    David Cronenberg's depiction in Cosmopolis of a passive, limo-encased master of the universe makes one nostalgic for the days when such ruthless tycoons wielded chainsaws. In Mary Harron's lacerating, hilarious adaptation of Bret Easton Ellis's unfairly maligned American Psycho (2000), future Bruce Wayne Christian Bale electrifies as the title psychopath, Patrick Bateman, who may or may not be turning his specialties of mergers and acquisitions into "murders and executions."

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  • August 26, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    For better or worse, Quentin Tarantino's Reservoir Dogs (1992) shaped American independent filmmaking for years. The esoteric film references, the narrative acrobatics, the outrageously brilliant dialogue, and the perversely inventive violence - it's a style and sensibility that many have tried but few have succeeded in duplicating.

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  • August 19, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    There are a handful of movies from the '60s that filmmakers keep trying to copy yet never quite capture the electric thrill of the original. Sam Peckinpah's The Wild Bunch (1969) is one of them, and if within five minutes of the opening shootout you don't recognize a turning point in the history of film, there's no hope for you.

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