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  • March 10, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    If the late Maharishi Mahesh Yogi had his way, we'd all be enlightened and floating in the air, our asses six inches off the ground. Looking into the state of Transcendental Meditation is filmmaker David Sieveking, who was drawn to the movement because his idol David Lynch is one of its biggest advocates. As he shows in his documentary David Wants to Fly, everything is not quite blissful in the realm of TM.

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  • March 06, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Now that Watson the computer has become the new champion of Jeopardy, the machine takeover of the world is just a matter of time. To see what we can expect, check out this twin bill. We're all familiar with HAL 9000 in Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey; less well known - and maybe even more insidious - is Proteus in the ever-twisted Donald Cammell's Demon Seed, since he gets the hots for his inventor's wife.

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  • February 25, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    The late Yilmaz Güney brought international attention to Turkish cinema with Yol (1982), which he wrote and co-directed with Serif Gören. It's a harrowing, visually striking tale of released prisoners who find living under the then military dictatorship ruling the country even more dismal and confining than jail.

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  • February 25, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Lisa Cholodenko won't win a Best Director Oscar on Sunday night, as Kathryn Bigelow did last year for The Hurt Locker. Cholodenko didn't get nominated. But her film The Kids Are All Right could win for Best Picture, Best Screenplay, Best Supporting Actor (Mark Ruffalo), and Best Actress (Annette Bening).

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  • January 27, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    The Oscars might showcase the film industry's proudest achievements, but the Found Footage Film Festival - which annually selects the best of old VHS tapes found in dumpsters, Goodwill racks, and padlocked attics - reveals our souls. Joe Pickett and Nick Prueher host their latest selections, including a recorded session with hypnotist Dr.

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  • January 11, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    If you only see one film by the recently deceased director Blake Edwards, maybe it should be his 1961 adaptation of Truman Capote's Breakfast at Tiffany's (okay, you might want to include the best in the Pink Panther series, A Shot in the Dark, as well). Audrey Hepburn shines in her signature role as Holly Golightly, the whimsical, elegant waif who fascinates a new tenant (George Peppard) who moves into her Manhattan apartment building.

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  • January 07, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Those people at the MPAA sure have some funny ideas about what constitutes a dirty movie. They may have changed the rating of Blue Valentine from NC-17 to R, but Todd Haynes's Poison (1991) still bears its "No One Under 17 Admitted" stigma proudly. Inspired by the writings of Jean Genet, it's a triptych of stories in different styles: lurid crime drama, campy horror film, Fassbinder-like prison love story.

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  • December 31, 2010
    By Peter Keough

    Will Groucho go the way of his namesake Karl into the dustbin of history? Not as long as there are New Year's Day hangovers and Marx Brothers Triple Features at the Brattle Theatre. Some quotes to savor are "You can't fool me! There ain't no sanity clause!" from A Night at the Opera (1935 | 1:30 + 7:30 pm) ; "If I hold you any closer, I'll be in back of you," from A Day at the Races (1937 | 3:30 + 9:30 pm); and "Don't worry - this isn't the first time I've been in a closet," from the rarely screened A Night in Casablanca (1946 | noon + 5:45 pm).

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  • November 26, 2010
    By Peter Keough

    Although you might not know it from such recent releases as Marmaduke and Vampires Suck, Fox studios has over the years released some of Hollywood's best films - as this weekend's "20th Century Fox 75th Anniversary" series at the Brattle Theatre attests. You can see for yourself with tomorrow's trio of features: Alan Arkin's directorial debut, the seldom screened black-comic gem Little Murders (1971; 2:45 + 7:30 pm); Robert Altman's breakthrough masterpiece, M*A*S*H (1970; 12:15 + 5 pm); and John Carpenter's kung fu classic Big Trouble in Little China (1986; 9:45 pm).

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  • November 19, 2010
    By Peter Keough

    As Neil Gaiman says about the title genius in Strange Powers: Stephin Merritt and the Magnetic Fields, "He made Lou Reed look like Little Orphan Annie." That's reason enough to see Kerthy Fix & Gail O'Hara's documentary about one of the best and least famous of indie-rock musicians. It screens this weekend at the Brattle with "special guests" TBA on Friday at 40 Brattle St, Cambridge | November 19-21 | $9.

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