bestnom1000x50
  • May 05, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Tired of standard gay romantic comedies that are stuck in the digital age? Time for Brit director J.C. Calciano's eCupid (2011), in which a brash ad executive hits 30, gets bored with his job, loses interest in his long-time relationship, and takes a chance on a new phone app that promises to stoke his love life.

    Read More

  • April 27, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Cyrus Harvey Jr., who passed away two weeks ago, at the age of 85, helped give the US its first taste of the heady pleasures of foreign and independent movies. His Janus Films distribution company was one of the first to bring the works of great directors like Ingmar Bergman, Akira Kurosawa, and Federico Fellini to these shores.

    Read More

  • April 25, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    With Republicans taking aim at abortion rights under the guise of budget cuts, it's the right time to check out Heidi Ewing & Rachel Grady's gripping documentary 12th and Delaware. The title refers to an intersection in Fort Pierce, Florida, that's a microcosm of the debate, with the local abortion clinic on one corner and a pro-life organization's headquarters across the street.

    Read More

  • April 16, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    The Great Muppet Caper

    Muppet movies have traditionally been the preferred alternative to The Hollywood Squares for stars on the wane, and as such they makes for classic cinema, as can be seen in today's Brattle Theatre tripleheader. Dom DeLuise and Orson Welles co-star with Kermit the Frog in The Muppet Movie (1978); John Cleese and Diana Rigg share the screen with Miss Piggy in The Great Muppet Caper (1981); and Joan Rivers and Liza Minnelli compare styling tips with Fozzie Bear in The Muppets Take Manhattan (1984).

    Read More

  • April 14, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Labyrinth

    Source Code director Duncan Jones's dad, David Bowie, has always had a bit of the movie bug himself, bringing his uncanny charisma to films like Jim Henson's Labyrinth (1986). Looking a bit like Lindsay Lohan after a bender, his Goblin King lures a feisty teen played by Jennifer Connelly into the title maze, from which she must rescue her kid brother.

    Read More

  • April 11, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Under their façade of gaiety, carnivals conceal a sinister side of cultural mythology and power relationships. Or so suggests Margaret Brown in her documentary The Order of Myths. It delves deep into Mobile's Mardi Gras celebration - the oldest in the country and, in 2007, still racially segregated. There she finds secret societies, twisted violence, and lots of sequins.

    Read More

  • April 09, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    The Wizard of Oz (1939) is such a sacred text for cinephiles that it seems a bit blasphemous to subject it to a mash-up, but if it must be done, Pink Floyd's seminal album The Dark Side of the Moon is the way to go. The result is "The Dark Side of Oz" a mix of song lyrics and dialogue that the Brattle Theatre promises does proper homage to both sources.

    Read More

  • March 31, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Bike Porn: for some reason when you put those two words together, they sound extra dirty. "Bike Porn 4: Play" is the fourth annual reprise of the travelling film show which features shorts - bicycle shorts? - that show what a true velocipedist ("pedalophile?") is capable of. Or, to quote the event sponsor, Truth Serum Productions, it's a celebration of "bikesexuality, bikeuriosity, and bike objectification."

    Read More

  • March 27, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    The regular-person-becoming-a-superhero genre continues in popularity with James Gunn's Super, which will receive a special preview screening tonight at the Brattle under the auspices of the Independent Film Festival of Boston. Rainn Wilson (The Office) plays a guy who becomes a crime fighter named Red Bolt when his wife leaves him for a drug dealer.

    Read More

  • March 26, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    The Boston Underground Film Festival doesn't get truly underground until "CineMental Gets BUFF." The Cinemental folks have put together a memorable short-film program that they guarantee will include "the sexy, the queer, the intellectual, the experimental, the mainstream love, and, best of all, horror and singing nuns."

    Read More

  • March 23, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    "The Final Sentence"

    This would seem to be a good day to go to the movies. For 10 years, Central Productions has presented the best in local film in its Boston Cinema Census, and this year's selection looks like one of the best. Among the shorts being screened are Kevin McCarthy's ambitious "66/20-23," which plays audio of a conversation taking place on the title bus over broadcasts from the title cable channels, and J.

    Read More

  • March 22, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Repulsion

    Catherine Deneuve didn't start getting kinky with The Hunger - not after having worked with Luis Buñuel and Roman Polanski. Buñuel guides her through the exquisitely twisted Belle de jour (1967), in which she plays a gelid bourgeois housewife who works at a bordello as a hobby. Polanski shows her the ropes in Repulsion (1965), perhaps the most horrible and seductive version of Home Alone ever made.

    Read More

  • March 19, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    The Wendigo (2001)

    Every year the Oscars suck, and every year our advice is the same - if you want to see how this kind of show should be done, check out the now 17th Annual Chlotrudis Awards. The cinephilic members of the Chlotrudis Society for Independent Film hand out offbeat prizes and regale their audience with an astonishingly accomplished song-and-dance revue.

    Read More

  • March 17, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Vampires are hot these days, but they'll never be as hot as the incubus played by Catherine Deneuve in The Hunger (1983), Ridley Scott's creepily lush camp classic. She looks great as the ageless revenant who steams up the screen making whoopee with David Bowie and Susan Sarandon. That is, when she's not drinking the blood of witless joy seekers who look as if they'd wandered in from a Bret Easton Ellis novel.

    Read More

  • March 10, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Correction, in a perfect world, everyone would look like Audrey Hepburn or blonde beauty of the silver screen Catherine Deneuve. Tonight the Brattle is showing two films she made with François Truffaut. In Mississippi Mermaid (1969), she plays a mail-order Madagascar bride who's more than Jean-Paul Belmondo's wealthy tobacco farmer bargained for.

    Read More

« First | < Previous | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | Next >
ADVERTISEMENT
Related Articles

Hara-Kiri: Death of a Samurai
Boston Phoenix
Review: Hara-Kiri: Death of a Samurai
Published 7/27/2012 by MILES BOWE
Takashi Miike brings back samurai movies

Short Takes: Sleepless Night
Boston Phoenix
Review: Sleepless Night
Published 7/13/2012 by PETER KEOUGH
Frédéric Jardin's expert thriller

 Friends' Activity   Popular 
All Blogs
Follow the Phoenix
  • newsletter
  • twitter
  • facebook
  • youtube
  • rss
ADVERTISEMENT
Latest Comments
ADVERTISEMENT
Search Blogs
 
Outside The Frame Archives