bestnom1000x50
  • October 02, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Our Man in Havana (1959)

    As the release of the new 007 movie nears, the Brattle Theatre whets our appetite with its "Cloak and Dagger: Spies on Screen" series. Wednesday they screen the classic Our Man in Havana (1959), Carol Reed's adaptation of the Graham Greene novel starring Alec Guinness as the title vacuum salesman-turned-secret agent.

    Read More

  • September 29, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    What would Hollywood do without the Bard? For one thing they'd have to come up with another premise for Gil Junger's 10 Things I Hate About You (1999), in which Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew has been updated to a modern high school. Julia Stiles and a pre-Joker fame Heath Ledger star.

    ArtsEmerson in the Paramount Center, 559 Washington St, Boston | Sunday, September 30 @ 1 pm | $10 | 617.

    Read More

  • September 29, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    A little-known milestone in the history of movies took place 50 years ago at a film festival in Oberhausen, Germany, when 26 German filmmakers signed a statement demanding an independent cinema. In his lecture "Provoking Reality: the Oberhausen Manifesto," film historian Ralph Eue explains the movement and its influence and presents select films from the project Provoking Reality.

    Read More

  • September 28, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Phoenix film critic Brett Michel talks the talk at Talk Cinema, hosting a screening of Julian Farino's upcoming romantic comedy, The Oranges, a comedy about the fallout from a May/December romance. Watch the movie and air your opinions.

    Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard Ave, Brookline | Sunday, September 30 @ 10 am | $20; $10 students | 617.

    Read More

  • September 27, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    True, there's a presidential election coming up, but here's a chance to vote for something really important. From September 28 to October 4 the 15th annual Manhattan Film Festival will be screening its 10 finalists in 300 theaters in cities worldwide, our own Coolidge Corner Theatre included, inviting viewers to cast ballots for their favorite.

    Read More

  • September 21, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    FRIDAY | For Ellen
    Drama about a musician on the brink of success, and divorce. Check out this week's review.
    Brattle Theatre, 40 Brattle St, Cambridge | Friday, September 21-Sunday, September 23; Friday @ 8 pm | $9.75; $7.75 students; $6.75 seniors | 617.876.6837 or brattlefilm.org

    FRIDAY | The Passions of Werner Schroeter



    Read More

  • September 19, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Head Games

    It's had some rocky times, but the Boston Film Festival is back for its 28th year, this time ensconced in the classy digs of the refurbished Stuart Street Playhouse. Among the features scheduled are Head Games, in which Steve James of The Interrupters fame takes on sports head injuries, and Alexia Oldini's debut feature, To Redemption, about dark family secrets.

    Read More

  • September 16, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Nobody has quite the affectless, quirky, frigidly ironic (but always delightful) sensibility of Hal Hartley, except maybe his frequent collaborator, the actor Martin Donovan. The erudite CineCache series at the Brattle Theatre screens Donovan's directorial debut, Collaborator (2011), in which a failed playwright and a right-wing former criminal share their differences and similarities.

    Read More

  • September 16, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    In Alfred Hitchcock's early silent movies, nobody can hear them scream. In Blackmail (1929) , the last of these, a working girl murders a rakish painter in self defense. Panicking, she tries to cover it up, and a sympathetic detective helps her out. But there was a witness, which is where the blackmail comes in, and it climaxes with a chase in the British Museum, a warm-up for Mount Rushmore in North by Northwest

    Read More

  • September 15, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    The kids are skateboarding and acting cool, all right, but as the title of Martin Perseil's offbeat documentary makes clear, This Ain't California (2012). It is, in fact, '70s East Berlin, where three boys rebel against the stringent Marxist regime by imitating Western punks. The years pass and it is suddenly 1989 - the Wall has fallen, the kids have grown up, and now they must redefine their identities.

    Read More

  • September 14, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Slashed

    Can you name any great woman horror or fantasy filmmakers? For some reason Hollywood just doesn't let the fairer sex bloody their hands with those traditionally macho genres. The Etheria Film Festival, hosted by All Things Horror, might change their minds. It's an all-day juried event at the Somerville Theater showcasing horror shorts by talented women.

    Read More

  • September 12, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Before you completely write off the print medium, you might check out Jörg Adolph and Green Wetzel's documentary How to Make a Book with Steidl (2010). The publisher of the title, Gerhard Steidl, has helped artists and photographers like Ed Ruscha and William Eggleston transform their work into exquisite limited edition volumes.

    Read More

  • September 09, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    FedEx boxes of a certain size have never been the same after an infamous scene in David Fincher's Se7en (1998), a film that has its share of outrageously brutal moments. A serial killer has taken the seven deadly sins to heart, choosing victims who are flagrantly guilty of each vice and murdering them with hideous, Dantesque appropriateness.

    Read More

  • September 08, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    Howl's Moving Castle

    Nobody negotiates the fine line between nightmare and enchantment like Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki. Two of his best films are featured on Sunday, September 9 as part of the Brattle's Masters of Studio Ghibli series. In Spirited Away (2002), a little girl wanders through a derelict carnival and finds herself in a magical world that rivals Alice's Wonderland for surreal, mind-boggling weirdness.

    Read More

  • September 06, 2012
    By Peter Keough

    [Rec] (2007), the splashy Spanish zombie film remade by Hollywood into the more tepid Quarantine (2008), has itself generated sequels. The third in the series, Pablo Plaza's [Rec]3 Genesis (2012), resumes the premise of a zombie plague as seen in the now obligatory found footage. This time around the source is a wedding video, which records a reception that goes beyond Bridesmaids wrong when a guest starts eating human flesh.

    Read More

« First | < Previous | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | Next > | Last »
ADVERTISEMENT
Related Articles

Attend this film fest: REELAbilitiesBoston Film Festival @ Perkins School for the Blind + other venues
Boston Phoenix
Attend this film fest: REELAbilitiesBoston Film Festival @ Perkins School for the Blind + other venues
Published 2/1/2012 by Peter Keough
My Spectacular Theatre Already known for putting on one of the best film events in these parts, the organizers of the Boston Jewish Film Festival...

Boston Phoenix
See this film: Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure [with time travel talk by physics prof] @ the Coolidge
Published 1/29/2012 by Peter Keough
We've seen time travel so often in the movies you have to wonder why nobody's figured out how to do it in real life. Certainly...

 Friends' Activity   Popular 
All Blogs
Follow the Phoenix
  • newsletter
  • twitter
  • facebook
  • youtube
  • rss
ADVERTISEMENT
Latest Comments
ADVERTISEMENT
Search Blogs
 
Outside The Frame Archives