bestnom1000x50
  • March 22, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Repulsion

    Catherine Deneuve didn't start getting kinky with The Hunger - not after having worked with Luis Buñuel and Roman Polanski. Buñuel guides her through the exquisitely twisted Belle de jour (1967), in which she plays a gelid bourgeois housewife who works at a bordello as a hobby. Polanski shows her the ropes in Repulsion (1965), perhaps the most horrible and seductive version of Home Alone ever made.

    Read More

  • March 19, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    The Wendigo (2001)

    Every year the Oscars suck, and every year our advice is the same - if you want to see how this kind of show should be done, check out the now 17th Annual Chlotrudis Awards. The cinephilic members of the Chlotrudis Society for Independent Film hand out offbeat prizes and regale their audience with an astonishingly accomplished song-and-dance revue.

    Read More

  • March 18, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    The Killers

    Despite his terse, cinematic style, Ernest Hemingway never had much luck when his work was adapted for the screen. But there are a couple of exceptions. Frank Borzage made a stark, atmospheric A Farewell to Arms (1932), with Gary Cooper as the callow WWI ambulance driver and Helen Hayes as the nurse who loves him.

    Read More

  • March 17, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Vampires are hot these days, but they'll never be as hot as the incubus played by Catherine Deneuve in The Hunger (1983), Ridley Scott's creepily lush camp classic. She looks great as the ageless revenant who steams up the screen making whoopee with David Bowie and Susan Sarandon. That is, when she's not drinking the blood of witless joy seekers who look as if they'd wandered in from a Bret Easton Ellis novel.

    Read More

  • March 16, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    A Screaming Man (2010)

    Just as English means more than England, French means more than France, as can be seen in the Museum of Fine Arts' Francophone Film Festival. One such Francophone country is the African nation of Chad, the setting for A Screaming Man (2010), Saleh Haroun's tale of a hotel pool attendant struggling for survival during a civil war.

    Read More

  • March 10, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Correction, in a perfect world, everyone would look like Audrey Hepburn or blonde beauty of the silver screen Catherine Deneuve. Tonight the Brattle is showing two films she made with François Truffaut. In Mississippi Mermaid (1969), she plays a mail-order Madagascar bride who's more than Jean-Paul Belmondo's wealthy tobacco farmer bargained for.

    Read More

  • March 10, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    In Danny Boyle's harrowing 127 Hours, you see the protagonist take himself apart. In his spectacular adaptation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, which is currently being staged in London, you see him get sewn together. You can watch that idea work itself out in this live broadcast of the production (whose notices are good as, if not better than, those for Boyle's film) at the Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard Ave, Brookline | 6:30 pm | $20; $17 seniors | 617.

    Read More

  • March 10, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    If the late Maharishi Mahesh Yogi had his way, we'd all be enlightened and floating in the air, our asses six inches off the ground. Looking into the state of Transcendental Meditation is filmmaker David Sieveking, who was drawn to the movement because his idol David Lynch is one of its biggest advocates. As he shows in his documentary David Wants to Fly, everything is not quite blissful in the realm of TM.

    Read More

  • March 10, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    In a perfect world, everyone would look like Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961). Until that happens, we must be content with this sparkling adaptation of the Truman Capote novel, perhaps the late Blake Edwards's most charming movie, in which Hepburn plays Holly Golightly, the kooky waif who beguiles neighbor George Peppard.

    Read More

  • March 08, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Where are the women making film these days? Where are our local directors? Both questions are answered at the BU Cinematheque program "Experimenting Women: An Evening with Jodie Mack, Rebecca Meyers, and Alla Kovgan" a discussion with and screening of films by three of New England's top independent filmmakers: Dartmouth professor Mack, who'll show her abstract animations; Meyers, programmer for ArtsEmerson's film series, who'll screen her idyllic shorts; and the Russian-born Kovgan, who'll screen Nora, an experimental dance biography about a Zimbabwean choreographer.

    Read More

  • March 06, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Now that Watson the computer has become the new champion of Jeopardy, the machine takeover of the world is just a matter of time. To see what we can expect, check out this twin bill. We're all familiar with HAL 9000 in Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey; less well known - and maybe even more insidious - is Proteus in the ever-twisted Donald Cammell's Demon Seed, since he gets the hots for his inventor's wife.

    Read More

  • March 04, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    Any preconceptions about what constitutes Jewish film, or film in general, might be shattered by this year's Jewishfilm.2011, one of local cinema's most noteworthy events. Take the opening-night feature, Avi Mosher's shaggy-dog drama The Matchmaker (Once I Was) (2010). Set in 1968 Haifa, it depicts the initiation into adulthood of a teenager who learns about life from the title relationship broker.

    Read More

  • March 04, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    A lot of filmmakers these days are being compared to John Cassavetes, so this look at the real thing from the folks at ArtsEmerson might be illuminating. Faces (1968) is typical of his visceral, cinéma-vérité examinations of all too convincingly tormented relationships, as an older married couple (John Marley and Gena Rowlands) break up and pursue younger lovers.

    Read More

  • March 02, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    One of the world's most vital regions for film is showcased in the Museum of Fine Arts series New Latin American Cinema. It opens today with Brazilian directors Felipe Braganca and Marina Meliande's The Joy ( 2010 | 5:45 pm) in which the ghost of a murdered youth seeks refuge with his teenaged cousin. It screens along with Colombian director Oscar Ruiz Navia's Crab Trap (2009 | 8 pm), a naturalistically shot story about a man who encounters a young girl in an environmentally ravaged coastal town and is smitten by her innocence.

    Read More

  • February 25, 2011
    By Peter Keough

    The late Yilmaz Güney brought international attention to Turkish cinema with Yol (1982), which he wrote and co-directed with Serif Gören. It's a harrowing, visually striking tale of released prisoners who find living under the then military dictatorship ruling the country even more dismal and confining than jail.

    Read More

« First | < Previous | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | Next > | Last »
ADVERTISEMENT
Related Articles

Attend this film fest: REELAbilitiesBoston Film Festival @ Perkins School for the Blind + other venues
Boston Phoenix
Attend this film fest: REELAbilitiesBoston Film Festival @ Perkins School for the Blind + other venues
Published 2/1/2012 by Peter Keough
My Spectacular Theatre Already known for putting on one of the best film events in these parts, the organizers of the Boston Jewish Film Festival...

Boston Phoenix
See this film: Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure [with time travel talk by physics prof] @ the Coolidge
Published 1/29/2012 by Peter Keough
We've seen time travel so often in the movies you have to wonder why nobody's figured out how to do it in real life. Certainly...

 Friends' Activity   Popular 
All Blogs
Follow the Phoenix
  • newsletter
  • twitter
  • facebook
  • youtube
  • rss
ADVERTISEMENT
Latest Comments
ADVERTISEMENT
Search Blogs
 
Outside The Frame Archives