bestnom1000x50
  • February 28, 2013
    By Peter Keough

    Japanese documentary filmmaker Masao Adachi not only preached revolution in his fiery agit-prop films, he practiced it too, following up his pro-Palestinian-resistance newsreel/screed Red Army/PFLP: Declaration of World War (1971; 9 pm) by abandoning film to join the Japanese United Army in Lebanon, where he was arrested in 2002.

    Read More

  • February 23, 2013
    By Peter Keough

    When you think of the land that gave us Heidi, cuckoo clocks, and cheese, the topic of child abuse is not likely to come to mind. Nonetheless, from 1800 to the 1950s Switzerland farmed out hundreds of thousands of orphans and wayward youths to workhouses where they served as virtual slaves. In a presentation by the Goethe Institut, Swiss filmmaker Markus Imboden dramatizes this Dickensian injustice with this tale of Max, a 12-year-old boy sold to a farm family, where he is forced to work and treated brutally.

    Read More

  • February 22, 2013
    By Peter Keough

    Leos Carax makes public appearances almost as infrequently as he makes movies, so the two together is a rare treat. As part of the Harvard Film Archive's retrospective "Overdrive: The Films of Leos Carax," the sui generis French auteur will present and discuss his latest opus, the delightful, madness-inducing Holy Motors

    Read More

  • February 21, 2013
    By Peter Keough

    The Coolidge Corner Theatre continues its Django Unchained-inspired blaxploitation @fter Midnite movie series with Jonathan Kaplan's Truck Turner (1974). Like Django, Truck (Isaac Hayes) is a bounty hunter, but he's not as much of an idealist. He doesn't seek justice, or even the rescue of his beloved, but rather $1000 for bringing in a pimp named Gator.

    Read More

  • February 21, 2013
    By Peter Keough

    Stanley Kubrick's The Shining (1980) is the happy hunting ground for those prone to byzantine, if not paranoid, movie interpretations (the upcoming documentary Room 237 explores just a few of these). So it's well worth watching again no matter how many times you've already seen the kid riding the Big Wheel down the endless Overlook Hotel corridors, or the flirty, naked, decomposing woman in the tub, or the creepy Diane Arbus twins, or the diabolical bartender, or Jack Nicholson with a grin and an axe saying, "Heeere's Johnny!"

    Read More

  • February 20, 2013
    By Peter Keough

    Though One Life (2011) offers the usual anthropomorphic wildlife-documentary narrative - baby animals and their parents - spoken by a resonant, top-tier actor - Daniel Craig, in this instance - the cinematography is especially striking, and the creatures and their survival tactics have to be seen to be believed.

    Read More

  • February 19, 2013
    By Peter Keough

    Some experiences need to be shared to be endured. The Academy Awards is one of them. Every year the Brattle Theatre complies by throwing a pre-program bash. Okay, it's $75, but it goes to a good cause, the Brattle Foundation, and it gives you a chance to put a buzz on before Oscar-show host Seth MacFarlane starts reprising his Family Guy voices and so that even if Les Misérables wins Best Picture, you'll be having such a good time you won't care.

    Read More

  • February 15, 2013
    By Peter Keough

    As suggested by the title, Rob Grant's Mon Ami (2012) is a buddy movie, but with a twist - as well as slashes, chops, spurts, gouges, and other standbys of the slasher genre. The two friends of the title plan a kidnapping, and it goes so gruesomely, hilariously wrong that they make the culprits in Fargo look like criminal masterminds.

    Read More

  • February 13, 2013
    By Peter Keough

    The Master of Suspense got a raw deal in the lousy, recent biopic bearing his name, but the Coolidge Big Screen Classics series showcases his greatness with its screening of Rebecca (1940). In it, Joan Fontaine plays a fresh-faced ingénue whose fairy-tale marriage to a morose, elegant widower, played by Laurence Olivier, is disrupted by two women, one of whom is dead.

    Read More

  • February 12, 2013
    By Peter Keough

    Maybe today's rom coms would be better off if they just hushed a bit and aspired to the visual wit of classic silent comedies like Harold Lloyd's Girl Shy (1924). In it Lloyd plays the title shy guy who tries to compensate for his ineptitude with women by writing a macho dating book. But words turn to action when he must stop the wedding of the woman he fancies and engages in one of the most inventive, dazzling, and hilarious chases in cinema.

    Read More

  • February 10, 2013
    By Peter Keough

    In Carlo Guillermo Proto's documentary El Huaso (2012), the director's father, Toronto retiree Gustavo Proto, returns to his native Chile to fulfill his dream of becoming the rodeo star of the title. But tests suggest that he might have Alzheimer's, which could complicate, or maybe simplify his plans, since he intends to end his life once his condition becomes hopeless.

    Read More

  • February 09, 2013
    By Peter Keough

    It's a lot shorter than the Oscar show later this month, and it's a lot more fun, as well. The Boston Society of Film Critics Annual Awards and Screening takes place tomorrow night at the Brattle Theatre, and the featured film will be Best Documentary winner How To Survive a Plague (2012), with the director, David France, accepting his award in person and sticking around for a Q&A after the screening.

    Read More

  • February 06, 2013
    By Peter Keough

    More people should know about the University of Massachusetts Boston Film Series, which offers outstanding recent films, many of them local premieres, plus appearances by the filmmakers. This year's spring program runs through April 25 and opens today with Nisha Pahuja's The World Before Her (2012), a compelling documentary that compares and contrasts two different, and equally alarming, training camps for women in India: one for the Miss India beauty contest and the other for a Hindu-nationalist paramilitary group.

    Read More

  • February 05, 2013
    By Peter Keough

    Whether you like it or not, there's no stopping Lena Dunham, creator of the much beloved, much criticized HBO show Girls (see Michael Braithwaite's piece online at thephoenix.com). She'll be at the Museum of Fine Arts presenting Tiny Furniture (2010), the micro-budgeted indie film that got her started and in which she plays a precursor to the autobiographical protagonist of the TV show, encountering the same trials of degrading romance, existential ennui, skewed feminism, and self-loathing.

    Read More

  • February 04, 2013
    By Peter Keough

    RoboCop

    Two entertaining, shrewdly satirical, and slyly profound sci-fi movies helped salvage the '80s from the junk heap of cinema history. Paul Verhoeven's brutal and hilarious RoboCop (1987; 4:30 + 9pm) presaged the economic downfall of Detroit with its tale of a half-dead policeman rebuilt into a humanoid machine fighting crime in the blighted city.

    Read More

< Previous | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next > | Last »
ADVERTISEMENT
Related Articles

Attend this film fest: REELAbilitiesBoston Film Festival @ Perkins School for the Blind + other venues
Boston Phoenix
Attend this film fest: REELAbilitiesBoston Film Festival @ Perkins School for the Blind + other venues
Published 2/1/2012 by Peter Keough
My Spectacular Theatre Already known for putting on one of the best film events in these parts, the organizers of the Boston Jewish Film Festival...

Boston Phoenix
See this film: Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure [with time travel talk by physics prof] @ the Coolidge
Published 1/29/2012 by Peter Keough
We've seen time travel so often in the movies you have to wonder why nobody's figured out how to do it in real life. Certainly...

 Friends' Activity   Popular 
All Blogs
Follow the Phoenix
  • newsletter
  • twitter
  • facebook
  • youtube
  • rss
ADVERTISEMENT
Latest Comments
ADVERTISEMENT
Search Blogs
 
Outside The Frame Archives