bestnom1000x50
  • July 03, 2007
    By webteam

    I’ve already written about the bizarre convergence of Edward Yang, Bob Lobel and myself on a radio talk show in 2000 when I discussed the year’s movies with the popular WBZ sports reporter. Asked by the moderator what my favorite movie of the year was, I bolded pronounced, “Yi Yi.” “'Yi Yi?’” scoffed Lobel, incredulously.

    Read More

  • June 27, 2007
    By webteam

    Recently I trekked north to Salem, MA to visit the Peabody-Essex Museum and see the Joseph Cornell exhibit. Pretty much everybody knows about Cornell’s boxes, but his experimental films were new to me, and a friend and myself sat in the screening room and watched, entranced, a selection of his shorts.

    Read More

  • June 24, 2007
    By webteam

    Not that he needs any more publicity for his upcoming film "Sicko," but here's a rough transcript of an interview I had with Michael Moore when he made an appearance in Manchester, New Hampshire to promote the movie

    Q: You used to be print journalist. Want to go back to that? A little easier?

    MM: I often think about how much I like to write and how writing is more peaceful and sometimes a more personally enjoyable way to spend my time.

    Read More

  • June 20, 2007
    By webteam

    Twenty-five years ago Ridley Scott made “Blade Runner,” initiating the trend in adapting the works of sci-fi writer Philip K. Dick that continues to this day. Soon, it is rumored, he’ll be working on an adaptation of a different kind, starting what might be another trend in moviemaking and one that would seem right out of one of Dick’s bleakest, satiric dystopian visions: he’s making a movie out of “Monopoly.

    Read More

  • June 13, 2007
    By webteam
    I'm sure no one wants to wait until next Thursday to read my review of "Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer," which is when it will appear in print since the studio didn't screen it until yesterday, too late for the deadline for this week's issue of the Phoenix. Or perhaps even read it at all. Nonetheless, thanks to the magic of the Internet and probably to the annoyance of the folks at 20th Century Fox, here it is two days early.

    Read More

  • June 13, 2007
    By webteam

    I first started noticing this trend with the commercials. Here’s just one of the more obnoxious ones, for Coors beer:

    Wife in bathroom checking to see if the strip for her pregnancy test has turned blue: “Honey, I think this is what we’ve been waiting for…”

    Oafish husband checking to see if label of his beer has turned blue, indicating it has reached the perfect temperature for consumption: “Yes, I think it is!”

    Read More



  • May 28, 2007
    By webteam

    If the just announced Palme d’ Or winner at Cannes “4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days” went mano-a-mano at the box office with “Knocked Up,” Judd Apatow’s new comedy about sexual mores, which do you think would win?

    Here’s a hint: the former has been described as “a devastating Romanian film on back-alley abortion and daily despair in the communist era.

    Read More

  • May 24, 2007
    By webteam

    I find it very thoughtful of the people at Disney to ask film critics not to reveal the plot of “Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End.” Thoughtful because I doubt if a single critic, myself included, has any idea what the plot is, not just of this installment but the previous two, and their request gives us an excuse not to have to try to explain it.

    Read More

  • May 18, 2007
    By webteam

    I’d just watched Lars von Trier’s “The Boss of It All” (it opens locally May 25), which is almost Capraesque in its idealism and optimism, at least compared to the Danish director's other perversely nihilistic, black comic works. So I was surprised to learn that the notorious eccentric and prankster had suffered a paralyzing bout of depression so bad that he might quit directing.

    Read More

  • May 15, 2007
    By webteam

    Film critics are the spotted owls of journalism. They can only survive where people respect subtlety, art, depth, meaning, originality and tradition in movies. The steady progress of million dollar studio marketing machines and the decline in audience taste and patience -- call it Global Dumbing -- have wiped out most such environments.

    Read More

  • May 11, 2007
    By webteam

    A mini debate has raged of late about the future of film criticism, and the fact that only film critics seem interested in it suggests that the future is grim. Nonetheless I plan to weigh in on the topic in the near future, but before doing so I’d like to point out that behavior like that of John Boonstra, former film critic for “The Hartford Advocate,” does not make that future any brighter.

    Read More



  • May 09, 2007
    By webteam

    I never read Alice Sebold’s novel “The Lovely Bones” about a 14-year-old girl in Pennsylvania who posthumously observes the progress of the investigation into her rape/murder, but I was intrigued when Lynne Ramsay, the uncompromising Scottish director of “Ratcatcher” and “Morvern Callar" signed up to adapt it.

    Read More

  • May 03, 2007
    By webteam

    I might have been a little harsh in assessing the late former MPAA head Jack Valenti’s legacy a couple of postings ago, but at least I didn’t accuse him of being responsible for the Virginia Tech shootings. We’ll leave that for David Thomson in the Guardian film blog where the esteemed critic and author of "The Encyclopedia of Film" claims Valenti’s favoring violence over sex in the ratings system contributed to the atmosphere of violence that resulted in the murder of 32 people.

    Read More

  • April 30, 2007
    By webteam

    And speaking of censorship, the Independendent Film Festival of Boston's Sunday screening of Macky Alston’s’s disturbing documentary “The Killer Within” might have been your last chance to see it. It’s been pulled from release in the wake of the Virginia Tech killings. The story of a mild-mannered septuagenarian psychology professor who suddenly revealed that he not only murdered a fellow student back in 1955 but had planned a campus massacre that would have predated Columbine by decades, it even-handedly and candidly confronts such issues as what causes mass murders and whether such killers are ever amenable to rehabilitation.

    Read More

  • April 28, 2007
    By webteam

    I don’t like to speak ill of the dead, and I'm sure otherwise he was a great guy, but I think in the flood of encomias for Jack Valenti someone should mention that he was instrumental in putting a stranglehold on creativity in American filmmaking and ensuring the domination of studio mediocrity for at least 40 years.

    Read More

« First | < Previous | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75 | Next >
ADVERTISEMENT
 Friends' Activity   Popular 
All Blogs
Follow the Phoenix
  • newsletter
  • twitter
  • facebook
  • youtube
  • rss
ADVERTISEMENT
Latest Comments
ADVERTISEMENT
Search Blogs
 
Outside The Frame Archives