bestnom1000x50
  • September 14, 2005
    By webteam
    This release from the respected Committee to Protect Journalists speaks for itself. There is a much-more detailed analysis of the report on its web site. It is very important to state that the group, according to a spokeswoman, does not believe that any of the killings of journalists were deliberate.

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  • September 14, 2005
    By webteam
    Bill Brett, the longtime Boston Globe photographer, is one of the genuine good guys, a throwback to an era when the news business was less corporate, more intimate, and certainly more human. (At least I think there was such an era because I've heard about it.)

    So even if his new book of 240 black and white photos of Boston's bigshots was lousy, in all honesty, I would probably plug it.

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  • September 14, 2005
    By webteam
    This new study from the Center for Media and Public Affairs states what should by now be obvious. The majority of media coverage about Supreme Court nominee John Roberts has been positive.(Even the New York Times was nice.)

    This can be attributed to any one or more of these factors. Take your pick.

    1) The idea of liberal bias in the media is a myth peddled by the right.



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  • September 14, 2005
    By webteam
    Here's some rare good news concerning public opinion about the news media, according Editor & Publisher.

    According to a new survey, 77% of Americans say journalists have acted "responsibly" in covering Katrina. This is in keeping with the verdict of many media observers that the press -- assertive, aggressive and even confrontational in its coverage of the killer hurricane and its aftermath -- was both brave and credible in doing its job under very adverse conditions.

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  • September 14, 2005
    By webteam
    There's a major media storm brewing between ultra-wealthy businessman and America's Cup winner Bill Koch and The Boston Globe, specifically, it's smart and sharp-elbowed Living/Arts columnist Alex Beam.

    Fighting mad over an unflattering Aug 9. Beam column (sorry, this one is already in the Globe archives) that recounted some of Koch's past legal battles, Koch -- whose art, guns and racing boats are now on display at the Museum of Fine Arts -- has demanded a retraction and correction and is certainly hinting at litigation if he doesn't get them.

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  • September 13, 2005
    By webteam
    How about this exchange between President Bush and the media over the resignation of FEMA director Mike ("Brownie, you're doing a heck of a job") Brown reported in today's New York Times? Now that's accountability.

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    Asked about Mr.


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  • September 12, 2005
    By webteam
    Media Log is knee deep in two deadline assigments today. Will return as soon as possible.
  • September 09, 2005
    By webteam
    Channel 5 (WCVB-TV) is announcing today that Heather Unruh, co-anchor of the early morning "EyeOpener" newscast and the station's chief medical reporter, will now join Anthony Everett at anchor desk of the 5 pm newscast, replacing Natalie Jacobson in that time slot.
  • September 09, 2005
    By webteam
    As television journalism, this won't remind anyone of Edward R. Murrow at his best. But NBC's documentary "Tom Brokaw Reports: In God They Trust", which airs tonight at 8 o'clock offers at least a telling glimpse into the growing political power and politicization of the nation's mushrooming Evangelical Christian movement.

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  • September 08, 2005
    By webteam
    Mike Barnicle's traumatic departure from The Boston Globe seven summers ago amidst a swirl of allegations of fabrication and plagiarism left permanent scars on both the columnist and the paper. So it was interesting to listen today as Globe editor Marty Baron showed up on Barnicle's WTKK-FM talkshow to exchange some yuks and talk about the challenges facing the newspaper business.

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  • September 08, 2005
    By webteam
    This Salt Lake Tribune story about what happened to firefighters who rushed to the Gulf Coast region -- and coming from a newspaper in the reddest of red states -- is FEMA's and Mike Brown's worst nightmare. Make sure you check out the last graph.

    I found a link to this on Andrew Sullivan's blog, which is collecting a lot of Katrina material.

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  • September 08, 2005
    By webteam
    Richard Bergenheim, the new editor of The Christian Science Monitor has an unenviable task. He must try and reverse the fortunes of a newspaper that is widely admired but little read, one that is laying off staff, bleeding red ink and hemorrhaging circulation. A Christian Science practitioner and teacher in New York, Bergenheim was asked to abruptly change career paths and take charge of the Monitor in May.

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  • September 08, 2005
    By webteam
    Hurricane Katrina not only destroyed life as we knew it along America's Gulf Coast. It changed the nation's political calculus by highlighting the country's racial and class chasms, unleashing a torrent of bipartisan criticism of the Bush White House and awakening a timid and kowtowing mainstream media. Read "Katrina Rips Bush a New One" in this week's Phoenix.
  • September 07, 2005
    By webteam
    Now it's official. In what has to be considered a surprise choice, WBUR-FM has selected longtime Channel 5 general manager Paul La Camera to become the public radio outlet's new general manager. Below are excerpts from the release put out by station owner Boston University:

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  • September 07, 2005
    By webteam
    Since the media's fascination with the political fallout from Katrina has now officially begun, here's today's take from The Note, ABC News's smart and smarmy daily compendium and analysis of the political chatter:

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    Although much of the politics of Katrina is taking place behind the scenes, with strategists constrained by the societal pledge to "keep politics out of this," senior strategists in both parties are now fully engaged on what all this might eventually mean in the short and medium term for American politics.


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