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  • August 23, 2005
    By webteam
    In this week's Boston Phoenix, the "Don't Quote Me" column -- headlined "Black and white" -- described the controversy engendered by The New York Times Co.'s decision to unveil the Gainesville Guardian, a free paper targeted to Gainesville Florida's black community. In some quarters, there was criticism and skepticism about whether a big powerful mainstream media company was best suited to publish a black-oriented paper.

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  • August 23, 2005
    By webteam
    It wasn't the only reason given for his departure, but it sounds like Jim Mullin's conscience is bothering him. The editor of the Miami New Times announced he is leaving that job about a month after his paper published a series of allegations -- some of them lurid and salacious -- about Arthur Teele, the former Miami Commissioner who killed himself on July 27 just as the story broke.

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  • August 22, 2005
    By webteam
    I'm not the world's biggest fan of sportscaster/talkmaster Bob Costas, who for my money is a little too well-dressed, too silky smooth, and far too self-satisfied. (His saving grace is his devotion to Mickey Mantle Number 7 who was also my childhood idol.)

    But now that Larry King's backup host on CNN refused to do a show on missing teenager Natalee Holloway Costas opts out, he's earned some serious respect.

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  • August 19, 2005
    By webteam
    Cindy Sheehan, the grieving mom who had transformed the area near George Bush's vacation retreat into a major antiwar protest site has left camp -- perhaps temporarily -- to be with her sick mother. Sheehan leaves

    But even before her departure, the story -- as all longrunning sagas eventually do -- had begun to evolve from being about her to being about the media's coverage of her.

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  • August 18, 2005
    By webteam
    For the first time in its 13-year history, Spare Change News -- the biweekly that covers homelessness and poverty and is distributed by homeless people -- printed a "special edition" today to refute Boston Herald stories suggesting that a man known as "The Stomper" may have been connected to the recent death of homeless man Steven Neiber.

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  • August 18, 2005
    By webteam
    Not that you probably needed more evidence, but here's some number crunching from the Nielson Montior-Plus and the University of Wisconsin Advertising Project indicating that the much anticipated multi-million dollar TV ads wars over George Bush's Supreme Court nominee just haven't materialized. The real message of the survey: it'll be a cakewalk for Judge Roberts.

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  • August 18, 2005
    By webteam
    New Boston Globe ombusmen Richard Chacon raised a good issue in his Aug. 7 column when he said the paper should be more rigorous in vetting the statements and sources used in opinion columns, applying the same standards it would employ on the news pages. Below are excerpts from that column:

    "Shouldn't opinion columns be held to the same strict standards for sourcing and attribution that are applied to stories in the news sections? Absolutely.

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  • August 18, 2005
    By webteam
    Given the recent exits of Tom Brokaw and Dan Rather and the death of Peter Jennings, one would think that some network news poobah would take this opportunity to redefine and re-vamp the aging nightly newscast format that is steadily losing market share. How many working people are home at 6:30 each evening anyway?


    It looks like NBC, with Brian Williams at the helm, and ABC, which has not named a Jennings successor, are planning on sticking with the status quo.


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  • August 18, 2005
    By webteam
    Starting next week, the New York Times Co. will unveil a free weekly newspaper targeted at the black community in Gainesville Florida. In the "Don't Quote Me" column -- "Black and White" -- in today's Phoenix, learn why this experiment in ethnic publishing by a major media company is raising hackles and thorny racial issues.
  • August 17, 2005
    By webteam
    There is boiling blood and word of a possible walkout at the Village Voice in the light of a management decision to cut writers' payments at the frequently fractious alternative weekly. Voice Here's an update in the New York Post:



    VOICE STAFF THREATEN WALKOUT

    By SAM GUSTIN

    Enraged staffers at the Village Voice are threatening to walk out if the fabled alternative weekly makes good on its pledge to slash the rates it pays its writers, according to sources inside the paper.







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  • August 17, 2005
    By webteam
    If people really consumed the kind of news they tell pollsters they want, The Christian Science Monitor would be in much better shape than it is today. Monitor The Monitor is thoughtful and smart with a clear sense of mission and a notable disdain for sensationalism. Unfortunately, all those things also make it an anachronism in today's frantic and frothy news environment.

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  • August 17, 2005
    By webteam
    There can be little doubt that on television, the most important time of day for news and information is early morning. That's one reason why there's so much speculation that ABC's Charlie Gibson is more valuable to the network on "Good Morning America" than as a potential 6:30 p.m. successor to the late Peter Jennings. USA Today story on anchor succession strategies

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  • August 16, 2005
    By webteam
    Boston Globe editor Marty Baron today put the kibosh on speculation that he could be headed to the Los Angeles Times to become a managing editor under that paper's editor and his good friend, Dean Baquet.

    And Boston Herald editorial director Ken Chandler, while not quite so definitive, downplayed any suggestion he might return to his old stomping grounds at the New York Post.

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  • August 16, 2005
    By webteam
    It was so easy to figure even I predicted it. But the Post has pulled out of the Pentagon's Sept. 11 "Freedom Walk." (See previous Media Log entry "The Washington Post Steps In It.") Read all about it from the horse's mouth. Washington Post

    The only problem with doing the right thing belatedly is that everybody knows you screwed up in the first place. What were they thinking?
  • August 15, 2005
    By webteam
    I think most of us in the media ethics business would be shocked if we knew all of the "community-oriented" events and "good" causes that the business and public relations side of various news outlets get involved in. And The Washington Post's decision to co-sponsor a Sept. 11 memorial walk organized the Pentagon -- one that would appear to have the potential to become a politicized event -- is a major no-no.

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