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  • July 20, 2005
    By webteam
    Frankly, I hadn't posted anything about the strange and sad tale of recently departed Boston Herald sportswriter Michael Gee's short tenure as a teacher at Boston University at least in part because 1) I am not a big schadenfreude guy 2) Michael is a friend and someone who once graced this paper's pages with some of the finest sportswriting around and 3) In the interest of full disclosure, I wrote a recommendation on his behalf to the BU Journalism Department.

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  • July 20, 2005
    By webteam
    You don't know whether this is true yet, but this report in LA Observed that L.A. Times editor John Carroll is stepping down would hit the newspaper world like an earthquake. LA Observed

    Carroll, who was at the helm when the Times won a staggering five Pulitzers in 2004, is one of the most respected editors in the business. For those with a more parochial Boston-centric bent, it's worth remembering he was very close to becoming the curator of Harvard University's Nieman Foundation before he decided to take the big job in La La Land. Could it be possible that he regrets the choice he made?
  • July 19, 2005
    By webteam
    Although the eye-catching news last Friday from public radio station WBUR was the cancellation of the station's home-grown talk show, "The Connection," which was hosted by Dick Gordon, another distinguished station journalist was also let go last week. And that news flew under the radar screen.


    Michael Goldfarb, the London-based senior correspondent for the station's "Inside Out" documentary unit Goldfarb bio became another casualty of the station's drive to cut costs and concentrate on more local programming.


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  • July 18, 2005
    By webteam
    CBS4, Boston's ratings-challenged Viacom-owned CBS station, jettisoned its news director Matt Ellis today. Ellis had taken over in 2004 after veteran news director, Peter Brown, a fixture at the station, had moved on. During a meeting this morning with newsroom employees to explain the move, general manager Julio Marenghi talked about the need for new leadership and direction at CBS4, according to a station source.

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  • July 15, 2005
    By webteam
    This press release from WBUR-FM buries the lead. The "Connection," the talk show started by Chris Lydon and handed off to Dick Gordon in 2001 after Lydon had an ugly divorce from the station, will soon be no more. Station staffers got the word about the change this afternoon.

    Of course, the irony now is that Lydon is back on the airwaves here.

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  • July 15, 2005
    By webteam
    In a move with possible implications for the raging wind farm debate on Cape Cod, Boston Phoenix, news today that Cape Cod Times editor Cliff Schechtman is leaving to take a job at Newsday. Cape Cod Times


    An ambitious, aggressive editor determined to make the Times the key media player on the Cape, Schechtman --who not only ran the newsroom, but also sat on the paper's editorial board -- was a lightning rod for critics who believed the Times's staunch opposition to the wind farm on its editorial pages was excessive and occasionally bled over to news coverage.


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  • July 14, 2005
    By webteam
    In this week's Boston Phoenix, the "Don't Quote Me" column -- headlined "Terror Diary" -- chronicles the media's reaction to the horrific July 7 carnage in London and traces how an attack over there quickly engendered jitters, debate, and anxiety back here.
  • July 13, 2005
    By webteam
    The worst job in Washington right now has got to belong to White House press secretary Scott McClellan. For the third day in a row, he got stampeded by the roiling controversy stemming from relevations that Karl Rove spoke to Time magazine's Matt Cooper about CIA operative Valerie Plame -- without necessarily mentioning her by name or knowing she was covert.

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  • July 12, 2005
    By webteam
    For some Democrats, liberals and anti-Bush folks, Karl Rove has become Moby Dick to their Captain Ahab. As his political success has morphed into a reputation for omnipotence, the unseen hand of Rove has been suspected, if not detected, in any number of episodes. One theory popular in some circles is that it was Rove who made sure that the dubious documents about George Bush's military record found their way to Dan Rather and the "60 Minutes Wednesday" crew, leading to the discredited Sept.

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  • July 11, 2005
    By webteam
    Despite one eyewitness account that copies of Sidekick were being sold separately today at a Store 24 in Somerville, a Globe spokesman insists that the 16-page insert is not intended as a stand-alone product and will be available only as part of the larger daily paper. A little opening day confusion is likely responsible here, so you'd better act fast if you just want to plunk down a quarter for comics, listings, and puzzles and skip the news from Iraq and London.
  • July 11, 2005
    By webteam
    What new member of The Boston Globe family -- delivered in a downsized format -- offers a bite-sized digest of information and entertainment aimed at people who don't necessarily have the daily newspaper reading habit?

    If you guessed the Metro, the free commuter-oriented daily tabloid that the Globe purchased a stake in earlier this year -- after a spirited Boston Herald effort to block the deal -- you would have been right.

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  • July 07, 2005
    By webteam
    Thirty years ago, with millions of Americans watching, a TV journalist at Minneapolis station WJM named Mary Richards went to jail rather than reveal the identity of a confidential tipster. That Emmy-winning episode of "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" helped explain the concept of anonymous sources to a good chunk of the country and probably created a reservoir of viewer sympathy for the spunky sitcom protagonist.

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  • July 07, 2005
    By webteam
    By early evening London time (and midday here), just as the streets of that wounded city were returning to some semblance of normality, the television tale of today's horrific attacks had jumped back across the pond.
    Gone were the earlier scenes of chaos and carnage from the streets of London, replaced by images of bomb sniffing dogs and security personnel in U.

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  • July 07, 2005
    By webteam
    Ameicans waking up this morning to blaring "Breaking News" banners on the cable news nets, usually perky morning anchors looking grim, and frightening scenes of shocked and wounded commuters in London naturally began thinking back to Sept. 11, 2001. Media Blog will have more on televised coverage of the London terror attacks and people looking for complete and quick updates can log on to
    bbc
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