bestnom1000x50
  • April 27, 2007
    By Wendy Kaminer
    Some people actually like receiving automated phone messages from political candidates (go figure; some people like watching reality tv;) but recent increases in robocalls have naturally prompted increases in complaints about them. The New York Times reports that more than 20 states are considering restricting their use.

    Read More

  • April 24, 2007
    By Wendy Kaminer
    Free speech advocates who railed against Imus’s dismissal, warning that it would embolden the censorious forces of political correctness, will soon be saying “I told you so.” This week, two New York City shock jocks were suspended indefinitely by CBS after an inflammatory prank call to a Chinese restaurant, following protests by the Organization of Chinese Americans.

    Read More

  • April 11, 2007
    By Wendy Kaminer
    Imus hasn’t yet checked into rehab, but the uproar over his racist swipe at the Rutger’s women’s basketball team has otherwise followed the usual script. Apology, followed by abject apology, followed by a stream of commentary (we have all seized the moment,) a futile effort to appease the gleefully opportunistic Al Sharpton, expressions of opprobrium from Imus's bosses, instability among advertisers, a two week suspension, and a segment on The Daily Show.

    Read More

  • April 10, 2007
    By Harvey Silverglate

    The would-be censors of “hate speech” are at it again. This time the target is irrepressible radio talkmeister Don Imus, who mouthed off (nothing new in that) on his nationally syndicated radio talk show, carried in Boston by WTKK 96.9 FM. Imus had the bad judgment to refer to the members of the Rutgers University women’s basketball team as “rough girls” and “nappy-headed hos.

    Read More

  • April 04, 2007
    By Harvey Silverglate

    I seem always to be at a disadvantage in arguing for toleration of ugly speech even if it creeps right up to the edge of being a direct threat, as some of the sexist rants noted by Wendy Kaminer and in Joan Walsh’s Salon post to which Wendy linked. My disadvantage comes from the fact that I do not appear to be a member of what today has come to be called a “historically disadvantaged group.

    Read More

  • March 20, 2007
    By Harvey Silverglate

    Having spent decades fighting in the trenches on the front lines of the battle over campus censorship, and having co-founded a nonprofit that seeks to remedy these widespread violations of academic freedom, I can vouch for the fact that the spirit of censorship is more alive in higher education, among administrators and faculty members, than anywhere else in our society.

    Read More

  • March 19, 2007
    By Wendy Kaminer

    What’s perhaps most striking about some campus censors today is the boldness with which they refuse to hear opposing views, much less provide forums for them. You don’t have to be an axe murderer or current or former dictator to be blackballed by some campus "progressives." You could simply be former Harvard president Larry Summers, whose March 14th talk at Tufts University about undergraduate education was boycotted by some Tufts professors.

    Read More

  • March 17, 2007
    By Wendy Kaminer

    Harvey chides me for “glossing over” the “rights” of parents who sued the Lexington school district for exposing their elementary kids to sympathetic books about gay families. They lost their case in federal court, when Judge Wolf dismissed their federal constitutional claims and their claims under state law. As Harvey notes, the parents are free nonetheless to press their state law claims in state courts: these claims were dismissed without prejudice –- not because this is a hard case, as Harvey suggests -- but because state courts are the appropriate arbiters of novel state statutory claims.

    Read More

  • March 16, 2007
    By Wendy Kaminer

    Wendy Kaminer too readily glosses over the rights of the parents who lost their case against the Lexington school authorities in early March when United States District Judge Mark L. Wolf dismissed their complaint seeking to exempt their elementary school children from a curriculum promoting tolerance of homosexuality in general and same-sex marriage in particular.

    Read More

  • March 15, 2007
    By Wendy Kaminer

    Last month, the religious right lost a local skirmish in the culture war when federal district court Judge Mark Wolf ruled that Lexington school officials did not violate the Constitution by distributing two books about gay families in a Lexington elementary school. Wolf dismissed a case brought by 4 parents who regard homosexuality as sinful and argued that the effort to teach tolerance and respect for gay people and families interfered with their First Amendment rights to raise their children according to their own religious beliefs.

    Read More

  • March 14, 2007
    By Harvey Silverglate

    It is said that the history of war is written by the victor. But history written by governments, or by pressure groups, is notoriously unreliable. This is where scholars come in handy.

    It was with this in mind – not to mention that I’m currently litigating a case involving the censorship, from Massachusetts state curricular materials, of any dissident views on whether the Ottoman Turks committed a Genocide on their Armenian population during and after World War One – that I attended a lecture at Harvard on March 13th by Guenter Lewy, professor emeritus of political science at University of Massachusetts Amherst.

    Read More

  • March 13, 2007
    By Wendy Kaminer

    Given all the reasons to fear that the end might be near (global warming and the spectre of nuclear or biological terrorism to name just a few,) you might expect people to gain some sense of perspective about the “dangers” of free speech. You would be wrong.

    Speech phobias are on the rise. They're partly related to sex phobias, and they partly reflect widespread liberal abandonment of civil liberty when it makes previously subordinated groups uncomfortable.

    Read More

  • March 01, 2007
    By Wendy Kaminer

    What is it about pornography that drives sane people crazy? And by "people," I mean law enforcement agents, legislators, and judges, in particular. This week the Supreme Court turned down an appeal from an Arizona man who was sentenced to a mandatory 200 years in prison merely for downloading child porn. Morton Berger was prosecuted for 20 seperate counts of sexual exploitation of a minor for possessing (and by possessing, they mean downloading) 20 images of child porn (and by child porn, they mean "any visial depiction in which a minor is enagged in exploitative exhibition or other sexual conduct."

    Read More

  • February 22, 2007
    By Wendy Kaminer

    While I welcome Judge Haight's decision barring the NYPD from photographing and videotaping political demonstrations, it seems almost quaint, considering the ubiquity of surveillance cameras (private and public) that record so many of our public moves, routinely and without notice. In addition, we’re apt to be captured on tape by fellow citizens armed with video cameras, on the look-out for whatever behavior they consider worth exposing on the Net.

    Read More

  • February 21, 2007
    By Harvey Silverglate

    I recall walking into the Cambridge Police Department headquarters in Central Square one day during the peak of the Vietnam era anti-war protests. Looking for a particular officer, I accidentally wandered into an office maintained by the “intelligence” unit of the department. There I came across a wall of photographs spanned of college students and Cambridge residents at local anti-war demonstrations.

    Read More

< Previous | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
ADVERTISEMENT
Related Articles

The one line from judge's ruling in Occupy Boston that could set us back 50 years
Boston Phoenix
The one line from judge's ruling in Occupy Boston that could set us back 50 years
Published 12/7/2011 by S.I. Rosenbaum
 "Little in the way of expression is outlawed under the United States Constitution, but an act which incites a lawful forceful response is unlikely to...

Boston Phoenix
We the People don't like Washington
Published 9/9/2011 by DANIEL MCGOWAN
The Tube

 Friends' Activity   Popular 
All Blogs
Follow the Phoenix
  • newsletter
  • twitter
  • facebook
  • youtube
  • rss
ADVERTISEMENT
Latest Comments
ADVERTISEMENT
Search Blogs
 
Free For All Archives